Create your 2011 Calendar in Word 2007

A quick post for all you guys out there that have to manage Office 2010 deployments in a business.  Microsoft have made available a great resource that outlines all the different Group Policy settings for Office 2010 – a must have resource if you want to manage your Office 2010 deployment well.

Check it out at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=66a6848c-6c28-4b61-9c12-a8cad4b380a4&displaylang=en

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Well it is New Years Day in most of the world – Welcome to 2011!!!

So with that in mind lets figure out how to create a 2011 Calendar using Word 2010.  Creating a personalised calendar – whether a simple month view or something a bit more complicated which you can record appointments, mind see the lunar phases, try
or public holidays – is an absolute breeze.

Here is how to create a 2011 Calendar in Word 2010:

  1. Go to the File menu, pills and click New
  2. Look at the Office.com Templates section.  If you are connected to the internet you will see a folder called “Calendars”.  Click on it!
  3. Click on “2011 Calendars”
  4. Select your preferred style from the library of calendar templates.

 

Simple as that – now you can go ahead and personalize the calendar to suit your needs, save it, print it out, and be more organised in 2011!

‘till next time!

TNP 😉

Hi – looking to see how to create a 2011 calendar in Word 2010 – click here.

With 2010 behind us in most parts of the world, women’s health
now is the time to start creating your own 2011 calendars using Word 2007.

It is a lot simpler than you think!  Here is how you do it.

1) Make sure you are connected to the internet

2) Click on the Office Orb in the top left hand corner of the screen (the old file menu)

3) Click on “New”

4) In the “New Document” dialog box that appears, on the left hand side you will see a long list of different template types you can find on Microsoft Office Online.  click on “Calendars”

5) Click on “2011 calendars”

6) Pick your favourite design from the dozens that appear!  Once you have selected the one you like, just click “Download” in the bottom right hand corner

7) After Word downloads the Calendar, it will appear ready for you to use, edit or print straight away.

It couldn’t be any simpler than that.  Wishing you and your family a wonderful year ahead!

‘till next time!

TNP 😉

Create your 2011 Calendar in Word 2010

A quick post for all you guys out there that have to manage Office 2010 deployments in a business.  Microsoft have made available a great resource that outlines all the different Group Policy settings for Office 2010 – a must have resource if you want to manage your Office 2010 deployment well.

Check it out at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=66a6848c-6c28-4b61-9c12-a8cad4b380a4&displaylang=en

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Well it is New Years Day in most of the world – Welcome to 2011!!!

So with that in mind lets figure out how to create a 2011 Calendar using Word 2010.  Creating a personalised calendar – whether a simple month view or something a bit more complicated which you can record appointments, mind see the lunar phases, try
or public holidays – is an absolute breeze.

Here is how to create a 2011 Calendar in Word 2010:

  1. Go to the File menu, pills and click New
  2. Look at the Office.com Templates section.  If you are connected to the internet you will see a folder called “Calendars”.  Click on it!
  3. Click on “2011 Calendars”
  4. Select your preferred style from the library of calendar templates.

 

Simple as that – now you can go ahead and personalize the calendar to suit your needs, save it, print it out, and be more organised in 2011!

‘till next time!

TNP 😉

It’s Time to Celebrate – Win a copy of 2007 Microsoft Office System Inside Out

So you are a hotshot who doesn’t need to use a mouse!  Fair enough, viagra 40mg power users tend to find they can do tasks quicker by using shortcut keys.  Shortcut keys are combinations of keystrokes on your keyboard that can make the program do a certain task.

The new Ribbon UI in Word 2007, Excel 2007, and PowerPoint 2007 is easier to use with a mouse, but if you want to use your keyboard shortcuts, there is a quick, easy, and visual way to find out what you need to press.

All you need to do, is hit the “Alt” key.  Simple as that.  By pressing the “Alt” button in Word 2007, the keyboard shortcuts appear on top of all the different sections of the Ribbon.

For example, (looking at the screenshot), to open the file menu, all I need to do is hit “ALT+F”.  If I want to save my file, which happens to be one of the Quick Access Toolbar buttons, I could hit “Alt+1”.  To change to the Insert Tab in the Word 2007 ribbon, I could hit “Alt+N”

As soon as you go to another tab in the ribbon, if you hit “Alt” again, you can see all the shortcuts for each piece of functionality on that tab.

 

So there you have it – all you need to do is remember “Alt” is your shortcut to keyboard shortcuts in Word 2007! (and Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 etc etc).

Want to master the key shortcuts in Word 2007?

TheNewPaperclip.com has put together a 5 day audio course that will help you remember and confidently use the key keyboard shortcuts in Word 2007 in just 15 minutes a day.  You can find out more over at www.shortcutcourse.com, or you can enrol in the course now.

Buy Now 

’till next time!

TNP 😉

Office 2007, Shortcuts, Tips, Tutorial, Word 2007

Hey everyone… welcome to October! (OMG almost Christmas!)

I am sure almost everyone who is reading this post has Excel installed on their computer at work or at university.  But how many of you really know what Excel is really capable of?

This month I am going to focus on Excel 2007 content.  One Excel 2007 tutorial each day for the entire month… 31 posts that will help you master Excel (and not the other way around!)

So are you ready to excel at Excel?  (sorry, viagra sale had to do it!)  Stay tuned!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Are you working with numbers in Excel 2007, advice
Excel 2010 or Excel 2013 that include decimal points?

Did you know you can quickly increase or decrease the precision… or the number of digits to the right of the decimal point.

For example:

  • Reduce the number of decimal point places in 56.923 to 56.9
  • Increase the number of decimal point places in 23.4 to 23.4256

To change the number of decimal places your numbers have simply:

1) Select the cells you want to work with

2) On the Home tab of the Ribbon in Excel 2007, look for the “Number” group

3) Click on either “Increase Decimal”, or “Decrease Decimal”.  They are the buttons which have all the zero’s on them with the left and right arrows.

Simple as that!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉
Are you working with numbers in Excel 2007, global burden of disease
Excel 2010 or Excel 2013 that include decimal points?

Did you know you can quickly increase or decrease the precision… or the number of digits to the right of the decimal point.

For example:

  • Reduce the number of decimal point places in 56.923 to 56.9
  • Increase the number of decimal point places in 23.4 to 23.4256

To change the number of decimal places your numbers have simply:

1) Select the cells you want to work with

2) On the Home tab of the Ribbon in Excel 2007, look for the “Number” group

3) Click on either “Increase Decimal”, or “Decrease Decimal”.  They are the buttons which have all the zero’s on them with the left and right arrows.

Simple as that!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉
Are you working with numbers in Excel 2007 that include decimal points? 

Did you know you can quickly increase or decrease the precision… or the number of digits to the right of the decimal point.

For example:

  • Reduce the number of decimal point places in 56.923 to 56.9
  • Increase the number of decimal point places in 23.4 to 23.4256

To change the number of decimal places your numbers have simply:

1) Select the cells you want to work with

2) On the Home tab of the Ribbon in Excel 2007, help
look for the “Number” group

3) Click on either “Increase Decimal”, or “Decrease Decimal”.  They are the buttons which have all the zero’s on them with the left and right arrows.

Simple as that!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

So you have upgraded to Word 2010!  If you have made the leap from Office 2003 or earlier, sale
you might have a few challenges finding some of the features you use regularly.  One of those great features is Undo!  (I think Undo is the feature I use the most!)

To undo in Word 2010, you can either do it using your mouse, or using some shortcut keys.

To undo using your mouse in Word 2010:

  • Look towards the top left hand corner of your Word 2010 window.  Just above the office button you will see a number of small icons along the top of the screen (by the way – that is called the “Quick Access Toolbar”).  Click on the one that looks like an arrow that points backwards – that is the undo button. 
  • If you want to undo more than one mistake action – click on the little down arrow beside that button, and it will give you a list of actions you can undo!

To undo using shortcut keys in Word 2010:

  • Simply hold down the “CTRL” key, and press “z” (CTRL+Z)
  • To undo more than once, just keep pressing CTRL+Z

So there you have it – the easy way to get rid of your mistakes in Word 2010! 🙂

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

(PS. try this article if you are looking to undo in Word 2007)

Are you building a spreadsheet and would like to know how many black cells you have in a given range in an Excel 2007, oncologist
Excel 2010 or Excel 2013 workbook?

There is a great function in Excel that you can use to do exactly that – count the number of BLANK cells in a range.

Simply type…

=COUNTBLANK(range)

(replace range with the range of cells you want to limit your count to).

Note that there is one particular thing that might slip you up with this function.  When using =COUNTBLANK(), buy cialis
Excel is only searching for blank, empty cells.  If you have a space in a cell for example – it might look empty to you, but Excel can see that there is a space – which means it will not think it is blank, and not count it.

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

If you are like me, thumb or anyone else that I work with, drugs
in fact if you are anyone in business today – chances are you use Outlook EVERY DAY!

And if you are like 99% of the population, you will double click on that Outlook icon every morning to open it.  Talk about wasting time! 

Did you know that we can automate things so Outlook will automatically start whenever you log into your computer. 

All you need to do is find the “Startup” folder in your Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7 start menu.  Once you have found it, simply drag the Outlook icon into that folder.

Actually this works with any program, not just Outlook.  So if you want to automatically start Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Internet Explorer… in fact any application on your computer – just drag the icon into the Startup folder.

So there you have it – one less thing for you to do in the morning!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Hey if you have upgraded to Office 2010, sales you might have noticed an unreal new feature which allows you to very quickly paste a screenshot into your Word 2010 documents, salve
Excel 2010 workbooks, visit this
or PowerPoint 2010 decks!

Here is how!

  1. Open up your Word 2010 document
  2. Click on the “Insert tab” in the Word 2010 ribbon
  3. Look for the “Illustrations” group
  4. Click on “Screenshot”

Once you click on “Screenshot, you have two options.  The first is to simply paste in the screenshots that Word 2010 has already taken for you!  For example, if you have four different applications open, Word has figured out that you might want a screenshot of one of those applications – and simply lets you pick which one you want to use (very smart!).  All you have to do is click on the screenshot you want to use!

The second is to take a screen clipping – which allows you very fine control over which part of your screen you want to take a screen shot of.  Simply click on “Screen Clipping” and then drag your mouse to select your screenshot.

Either way, getting screenshots into Word, Excel, and PowerPoint 2010 just became a whole lot easier!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Do you want to win a copy of “2007 Microsoft Office System Inside Out” by John Pierce – valued at $USD 49.99?  If so… read on…

 

This month is a great one here at The New Paperclip, drugs
for a number of reasons:

  1. The first month where I have had over 50 000 unique visitors, here
    who just like you are trying to solve their Office 2007 (and now Office 2010) challenges;
  2. I delivered a session at OfficeDevCon09 where there wasn’t a single spare seat in the room; and just today…
  3. I have launched a Facebook Fan page, so you can keep up to date with all the tips, tricks and tutorials from TheNewPaperclip.com!

So to celebrate all these good things, I am giving away a great resource – almost 1300 pages of everything you would ever want to know about Microsoft Office 2007.

So what do you need to do to be in the draw to win?

Before 15 December 2009 – simply do the following:

  • Become a Fan of The New Paperclip on Facebook, and
  • Post on the wall of the fan page the one thing you would love to know how to do, or problem you would love to solve in Office 2007.

I will pick a winner at random from all the wall posts, and let you all know here, and on the Facebook Fan page who the winner is.

That is all there is to it – just become a fan of The New Paperclip today, and let me know what Office 2007 problems you would like me to help you with – and you could win!  GOOD LUCK!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

PS… whilst we are at it, if you are on twitter and not following @thenewpaperclip… why not?

Put a Screenshot in a Word 2010 document

So you are a hotshot who doesn’t need to use a mouse!  Fair enough, viagra 40mg power users tend to find they can do tasks quicker by using shortcut keys.  Shortcut keys are combinations of keystrokes on your keyboard that can make the program do a certain task.

The new Ribbon UI in Word 2007, Excel 2007, and PowerPoint 2007 is easier to use with a mouse, but if you want to use your keyboard shortcuts, there is a quick, easy, and visual way to find out what you need to press.

All you need to do, is hit the “Alt” key.  Simple as that.  By pressing the “Alt” button in Word 2007, the keyboard shortcuts appear on top of all the different sections of the Ribbon.

For example, (looking at the screenshot), to open the file menu, all I need to do is hit “ALT+F”.  If I want to save my file, which happens to be one of the Quick Access Toolbar buttons, I could hit “Alt+1”.  To change to the Insert Tab in the Word 2007 ribbon, I could hit “Alt+N”

As soon as you go to another tab in the ribbon, if you hit “Alt” again, you can see all the shortcuts for each piece of functionality on that tab.

 

So there you have it – all you need to do is remember “Alt” is your shortcut to keyboard shortcuts in Word 2007! (and Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 etc etc).

Want to master the key shortcuts in Word 2007?

TheNewPaperclip.com has put together a 5 day audio course that will help you remember and confidently use the key keyboard shortcuts in Word 2007 in just 15 minutes a day.  You can find out more over at www.shortcutcourse.com, or you can enrol in the course now.

Buy Now 

’till next time!

TNP 😉

Office 2007, Shortcuts, Tips, Tutorial, Word 2007

Hey everyone… welcome to October! (OMG almost Christmas!)

I am sure almost everyone who is reading this post has Excel installed on their computer at work or at university.  But how many of you really know what Excel is really capable of?

This month I am going to focus on Excel 2007 content.  One Excel 2007 tutorial each day for the entire month… 31 posts that will help you master Excel (and not the other way around!)

So are you ready to excel at Excel?  (sorry, viagra sale had to do it!)  Stay tuned!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Are you working with numbers in Excel 2007, advice
Excel 2010 or Excel 2013 that include decimal points?

Did you know you can quickly increase or decrease the precision… or the number of digits to the right of the decimal point.

For example:

  • Reduce the number of decimal point places in 56.923 to 56.9
  • Increase the number of decimal point places in 23.4 to 23.4256

To change the number of decimal places your numbers have simply:

1) Select the cells you want to work with

2) On the Home tab of the Ribbon in Excel 2007, look for the “Number” group

3) Click on either “Increase Decimal”, or “Decrease Decimal”.  They are the buttons which have all the zero’s on them with the left and right arrows.

Simple as that!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉
Are you working with numbers in Excel 2007, global burden of disease
Excel 2010 or Excel 2013 that include decimal points?

Did you know you can quickly increase or decrease the precision… or the number of digits to the right of the decimal point.

For example:

  • Reduce the number of decimal point places in 56.923 to 56.9
  • Increase the number of decimal point places in 23.4 to 23.4256

To change the number of decimal places your numbers have simply:

1) Select the cells you want to work with

2) On the Home tab of the Ribbon in Excel 2007, look for the “Number” group

3) Click on either “Increase Decimal”, or “Decrease Decimal”.  They are the buttons which have all the zero’s on them with the left and right arrows.

Simple as that!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉
Are you working with numbers in Excel 2007 that include decimal points? 

Did you know you can quickly increase or decrease the precision… or the number of digits to the right of the decimal point.

For example:

  • Reduce the number of decimal point places in 56.923 to 56.9
  • Increase the number of decimal point places in 23.4 to 23.4256

To change the number of decimal places your numbers have simply:

1) Select the cells you want to work with

2) On the Home tab of the Ribbon in Excel 2007, help
look for the “Number” group

3) Click on either “Increase Decimal”, or “Decrease Decimal”.  They are the buttons which have all the zero’s on them with the left and right arrows.

Simple as that!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

So you have upgraded to Word 2010!  If you have made the leap from Office 2003 or earlier, sale
you might have a few challenges finding some of the features you use regularly.  One of those great features is Undo!  (I think Undo is the feature I use the most!)

To undo in Word 2010, you can either do it using your mouse, or using some shortcut keys.

To undo using your mouse in Word 2010:

  • Look towards the top left hand corner of your Word 2010 window.  Just above the office button you will see a number of small icons along the top of the screen (by the way – that is called the “Quick Access Toolbar”).  Click on the one that looks like an arrow that points backwards – that is the undo button. 
  • If you want to undo more than one mistake action – click on the little down arrow beside that button, and it will give you a list of actions you can undo!

To undo using shortcut keys in Word 2010:

  • Simply hold down the “CTRL” key, and press “z” (CTRL+Z)
  • To undo more than once, just keep pressing CTRL+Z

So there you have it – the easy way to get rid of your mistakes in Word 2010! 🙂

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

(PS. try this article if you are looking to undo in Word 2007)

Are you building a spreadsheet and would like to know how many black cells you have in a given range in an Excel 2007, oncologist
Excel 2010 or Excel 2013 workbook?

There is a great function in Excel that you can use to do exactly that – count the number of BLANK cells in a range.

Simply type…

=COUNTBLANK(range)

(replace range with the range of cells you want to limit your count to).

Note that there is one particular thing that might slip you up with this function.  When using =COUNTBLANK(), buy cialis
Excel is only searching for blank, empty cells.  If you have a space in a cell for example – it might look empty to you, but Excel can see that there is a space – which means it will not think it is blank, and not count it.

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

If you are like me, thumb or anyone else that I work with, drugs
in fact if you are anyone in business today – chances are you use Outlook EVERY DAY!

And if you are like 99% of the population, you will double click on that Outlook icon every morning to open it.  Talk about wasting time! 

Did you know that we can automate things so Outlook will automatically start whenever you log into your computer. 

All you need to do is find the “Startup” folder in your Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7 start menu.  Once you have found it, simply drag the Outlook icon into that folder.

Actually this works with any program, not just Outlook.  So if you want to automatically start Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Internet Explorer… in fact any application on your computer – just drag the icon into the Startup folder.

So there you have it – one less thing for you to do in the morning!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Hey if you have upgraded to Office 2010, sales you might have noticed an unreal new feature which allows you to very quickly paste a screenshot into your Word 2010 documents, salve
Excel 2010 workbooks, visit this
or PowerPoint 2010 decks!

Here is how!

  1. Open up your Word 2010 document
  2. Click on the “Insert tab” in the Word 2010 ribbon
  3. Look for the “Illustrations” group
  4. Click on “Screenshot”

Once you click on “Screenshot, you have two options.  The first is to simply paste in the screenshots that Word 2010 has already taken for you!  For example, if you have four different applications open, Word has figured out that you might want a screenshot of one of those applications – and simply lets you pick which one you want to use (very smart!).  All you have to do is click on the screenshot you want to use!

The second is to take a screen clipping – which allows you very fine control over which part of your screen you want to take a screen shot of.  Simply click on “Screen Clipping” and then drag your mouse to select your screenshot.

Either way, getting screenshots into Word, Excel, and PowerPoint 2010 just became a whole lot easier!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Start Outlook 2007 or Outlook 2010 automatically

So you are a hotshot who doesn’t need to use a mouse!  Fair enough, viagra 40mg power users tend to find they can do tasks quicker by using shortcut keys.  Shortcut keys are combinations of keystrokes on your keyboard that can make the program do a certain task.

The new Ribbon UI in Word 2007, Excel 2007, and PowerPoint 2007 is easier to use with a mouse, but if you want to use your keyboard shortcuts, there is a quick, easy, and visual way to find out what you need to press.

All you need to do, is hit the “Alt” key.  Simple as that.  By pressing the “Alt” button in Word 2007, the keyboard shortcuts appear on top of all the different sections of the Ribbon.

For example, (looking at the screenshot), to open the file menu, all I need to do is hit “ALT+F”.  If I want to save my file, which happens to be one of the Quick Access Toolbar buttons, I could hit “Alt+1”.  To change to the Insert Tab in the Word 2007 ribbon, I could hit “Alt+N”

As soon as you go to another tab in the ribbon, if you hit “Alt” again, you can see all the shortcuts for each piece of functionality on that tab.

 

So there you have it – all you need to do is remember “Alt” is your shortcut to keyboard shortcuts in Word 2007! (and Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 etc etc).

Want to master the key shortcuts in Word 2007?

TheNewPaperclip.com has put together a 5 day audio course that will help you remember and confidently use the key keyboard shortcuts in Word 2007 in just 15 minutes a day.  You can find out more over at www.shortcutcourse.com, or you can enrol in the course now.

Buy Now 

’till next time!

TNP 😉

Office 2007, Shortcuts, Tips, Tutorial, Word 2007

Hey everyone… welcome to October! (OMG almost Christmas!)

I am sure almost everyone who is reading this post has Excel installed on their computer at work or at university.  But how many of you really know what Excel is really capable of?

This month I am going to focus on Excel 2007 content.  One Excel 2007 tutorial each day for the entire month… 31 posts that will help you master Excel (and not the other way around!)

So are you ready to excel at Excel?  (sorry, viagra sale had to do it!)  Stay tuned!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Are you working with numbers in Excel 2007, advice
Excel 2010 or Excel 2013 that include decimal points?

Did you know you can quickly increase or decrease the precision… or the number of digits to the right of the decimal point.

For example:

  • Reduce the number of decimal point places in 56.923 to 56.9
  • Increase the number of decimal point places in 23.4 to 23.4256

To change the number of decimal places your numbers have simply:

1) Select the cells you want to work with

2) On the Home tab of the Ribbon in Excel 2007, look for the “Number” group

3) Click on either “Increase Decimal”, or “Decrease Decimal”.  They are the buttons which have all the zero’s on them with the left and right arrows.

Simple as that!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉
Are you working with numbers in Excel 2007, global burden of disease
Excel 2010 or Excel 2013 that include decimal points?

Did you know you can quickly increase or decrease the precision… or the number of digits to the right of the decimal point.

For example:

  • Reduce the number of decimal point places in 56.923 to 56.9
  • Increase the number of decimal point places in 23.4 to 23.4256

To change the number of decimal places your numbers have simply:

1) Select the cells you want to work with

2) On the Home tab of the Ribbon in Excel 2007, look for the “Number” group

3) Click on either “Increase Decimal”, or “Decrease Decimal”.  They are the buttons which have all the zero’s on them with the left and right arrows.

Simple as that!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉
Are you working with numbers in Excel 2007 that include decimal points? 

Did you know you can quickly increase or decrease the precision… or the number of digits to the right of the decimal point.

For example:

  • Reduce the number of decimal point places in 56.923 to 56.9
  • Increase the number of decimal point places in 23.4 to 23.4256

To change the number of decimal places your numbers have simply:

1) Select the cells you want to work with

2) On the Home tab of the Ribbon in Excel 2007, help
look for the “Number” group

3) Click on either “Increase Decimal”, or “Decrease Decimal”.  They are the buttons which have all the zero’s on them with the left and right arrows.

Simple as that!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

So you have upgraded to Word 2010!  If you have made the leap from Office 2003 or earlier, sale
you might have a few challenges finding some of the features you use regularly.  One of those great features is Undo!  (I think Undo is the feature I use the most!)

To undo in Word 2010, you can either do it using your mouse, or using some shortcut keys.

To undo using your mouse in Word 2010:

  • Look towards the top left hand corner of your Word 2010 window.  Just above the office button you will see a number of small icons along the top of the screen (by the way – that is called the “Quick Access Toolbar”).  Click on the one that looks like an arrow that points backwards – that is the undo button. 
  • If you want to undo more than one mistake action – click on the little down arrow beside that button, and it will give you a list of actions you can undo!

To undo using shortcut keys in Word 2010:

  • Simply hold down the “CTRL” key, and press “z” (CTRL+Z)
  • To undo more than once, just keep pressing CTRL+Z

So there you have it – the easy way to get rid of your mistakes in Word 2010! 🙂

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

(PS. try this article if you are looking to undo in Word 2007)

Are you building a spreadsheet and would like to know how many black cells you have in a given range in an Excel 2007, oncologist
Excel 2010 or Excel 2013 workbook?

There is a great function in Excel that you can use to do exactly that – count the number of BLANK cells in a range.

Simply type…

=COUNTBLANK(range)

(replace range with the range of cells you want to limit your count to).

Note that there is one particular thing that might slip you up with this function.  When using =COUNTBLANK(), buy cialis
Excel is only searching for blank, empty cells.  If you have a space in a cell for example – it might look empty to you, but Excel can see that there is a space – which means it will not think it is blank, and not count it.

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

If you are like me, thumb or anyone else that I work with, drugs
in fact if you are anyone in business today – chances are you use Outlook EVERY DAY!

And if you are like 99% of the population, you will double click on that Outlook icon every morning to open it.  Talk about wasting time! 

Did you know that we can automate things so Outlook will automatically start whenever you log into your computer. 

All you need to do is find the “Startup” folder in your Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7 start menu.  Once you have found it, simply drag the Outlook icon into that folder.

Actually this works with any program, not just Outlook.  So if you want to automatically start Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Internet Explorer… in fact any application on your computer – just drag the icon into the Startup folder.

So there you have it – one less thing for you to do in the morning!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

The New Paperclip @ Microsoft TechEd Australia 2009

Hi there!

Some of you will already know that Microsoft is currently testing the next version of Office… called Office 2010. Whilst it is not available in the shops yet, diagnosis yours truly has been helping out the folk at Microsoft to find bugs, skincare quirks, hemophilia or other annoying things in the product so you don’t have to.

The best part about me helping to test the product is that I am going to start sharing with you some of my favourite parts of Office 2010 – and start publishing some Office 2010 help, tips, tricks and tutorials so you can hit the ground running once the product is released sometime in the near future. Excited? I thought you might be! So here we go – my first post on Office 2010!

Blogging from Word 2010

Whilst this post has so far introduced you to the new Office 2010 content that will be published on The New Paperclip shortly, it is also my first test of the blogging feature in the Word 2010 Technical Preview. To be honest I never really used the feature in Word 2007 – I have been a fan of Windows Live Writer and have used that very successfully for a number of years – I thought I would bite the bullet and see if Word 2010 cuts the mustard.

In particular interest to me is how Word 2010 will manage posting categories, tags, images, text formatting, post scheduling and more. So let’s take a look at my first blogging experience with Word 2010.

To write a blog post in Word 2010

The first thing you need to do open up the new blog post template! Click on the Office button in the top left hand corner of the Word 2010 screen. In the menu that appears, click “New”, and then select “New Blog Post” from the available templates gallery. Then all you need to do is click “Create” and you are almost on your way!

Linking to your blog provider

TheNewPaperclip.com and all my other blog based publishing enterprises run on the WordPress engine – which Word 2010 links into incredibly well. The first time I opened the new Blog Post template in Word 2010, a dialog box appeared asking me to register my blog provider. (Note, you can access this dialog box any other time by going to the “Blog Post” tab in the ribbon, clicking “Manage Accounts” and then clicking “New”). I selected WordPress, typed in my website details, username and password, and within seconds Word 2010 was successfully talking to my blog. The first thing I noticed here that was different to Windows Live Writer is that Word 2010 did not download my blog theme so I can see exactly how the content will look when published as I write it. Not necessarily a bad thing as far as I am concerned, but you may disagree.

Creating the content

No matter what tool you use to create your blog posts, the content is the most important part. And realistically the tool you use has nothing to do with the quality of the content. That being said, the blogging tool you use has a lot to do with your productivity and how you present the information you want to include. This is where Word 2010 comes into its own.

Formatting Text

The standard stuff you would expect is all there – with the same familiar shortcuts you would use in Word normally. You want bold? Select that text and CTRL+B it!

Images

This is what I really like about using Word 2010 for blogging. The new “Screenshot” feature will be incredibly useful for when I am creating content for TheNewPaperclip. Here is a great example – at the moment I have a copy of PowerPoint 2010 running in the background. In the past my workflow would be to switch to PowerPoint, take a screenshot using the Print Screen button on the keyboard, open up MSPaint, paste the screenshot, resize or crop to my liking, save the image, switch back to Windows Live Writer, insert that image I just saved, and then do some finite resizing and positioning.

In Word 2010, all I need to do is click on the “Insert” tab in the ribbon, click the “Screenshot” button, and then select the screenshot of PowerPoint 2010 that Word has already generated for me in the gallery. This automatically drops the screenshot into the blog post, and now all I need to do is crop and resize using the standard word “Picture Tools Format” tab. And the best part is I can use all those funky picture formatting styles to add the perfect border to the screenshot! Like this one…

<Note – after publishing this post I realised that my picture upload settings were wrong – so you can’t see how awesome this PowerPoint 2010 Screenshot actually looks – with reflection and everything! Oh well – managing Word 2010 blog account picture upload settings sounds like a great post for later on!>

To add Alt Text to the image I just inserted into the blog post – just right click on the image, select “Format Picture…”, click on “Alt Text” and type text that is appropriate.

Categories and Tags

Inserting categories was a breeze. I just clicked “Insert Category” from the blog post tab on the ribbon. I could select from the categories that already exist on the blog (like “Level 200 – Regular User”), and I could also create a new category – in this case “Word 2010”. Tags are a different story though – on the face of it I can’t see any way to include them – I am guessing there is a plugin required.

Publishing

Which one came first – the chicken or the egg? Well the first time I publish a post using Word 2010 will be this one, so I can’t tell you exactly what the experience was like until I have actually posted it! That being said there are two publishing options I can see in the ribbon – the first is to publish a draft to your blog engine, and the second is to publish a final post. Speaking of which, I might publish this post now, and then try out the “Open Existing” feature to see if I can edit the post later on with a few more thoughts about at the process.

Hopefully see you on the flip side!

’till next time!
TNP 😉

 
 

<Content added after the original post was published – using the “Open Existing” post feature in Word 2010>

Ok – that was pretty painless. Only issue I encountered was that I had my picture upload settings all wrong, so none of the images came through – but that is pretty easily fixed. The one big disappointment was that there was no scheduling feature like I am used to in Windows Live Writer – but again I am sure there are some ways to get around that – like posting drafts to WordPress, and then adding a step to the workflow where you log into WordPress and schedule them from the administration console.

All in all, I feel that Word 2010 might be my choice from now on for blog writing and editing. As long as I get those picture upload settings right (problem exists between keyboard and chair!)

 

  

If you follow @thenewpaperclip on Twitter (or @paulwoods – the guy behind The New Paperclip), information pills
you would have known that I was presenting at TechEd Australia the past week.

My session (with Microsoft Australia’s Andrew Lowson) was titled “Personal Productivity for the IT Pro” and was one of the level 100 sessions in the Office System track.

It was never meant to be a deep dive – simply a session to highlight some quick productivity wins you can get simply by getting to know the tools you already have in front of you – in this case, Microsoft Office.

The best part of the session was that about about half way through we handed it over to the audience and started crowd sourcing productivity tips.  It was obvious that there are some very smart, very passionate people out there – and plenty of knowledge was shared

For those of you who could not make it to TechEd, or are unable to access the session I delivered via your TechEd Online subscription, whilst on site at the Gold Coast Convention Centre I did record a TechTalk just for you.

Titled “The Productivity Myth”, this interview with Alistair Speirs from Microsoft Australia will give you a taste of what the session was all about.

If you want to read more about “The Productivity Myth” – check out this blog post

Looking forward to seeing you all at TechEd next year!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉