Word 2007: Start Word 2007 Without the Splash Screen

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

For many, tablets
students particularly, try
word count is a very important feature in Word.  I remember the good old days when back at Paperclip school.  When completing school assignments, Sildenafil
for some reason it not the quality of your writing that counted, but your ability to write as close as possible to 3000 words on a topic!

For those of you who feel the pain of word-limit assessment, or are simply interested in knowing how many words are in a document, Word 2007 makes it easier for you.

Firstly, you do not have to go looking for the word count feature.  In Word 2003 and previous versions, word count was hidden in the menu structure.  That is no more.

Word count now appears in the bottom left hand corner of the Word 2007 interface.  As you type, it will automatically update with the current word count.

But what if you want to know how many words are in a selection of text that you just made?  Simple.  Just select your text, and look back at the bottom left hand corner of the screen.  Word displays both the number of words in the selected text, and the total number of words in the document.

Finally if you want detailed statistics on the number of pages, words, paragraphs, characters (with and without spaces), and the number of lines in your document, simply click on the word count box which we have been talking about during this article.  A word count dialog box will appear with all the statistics you need.

Until next time!

TNP 🙂

[tags]Word 2007, Microsoft Office 2007, Word Count, Tutorial[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

For many, tablets
students particularly, try
word count is a very important feature in Word.  I remember the good old days when back at Paperclip school.  When completing school assignments, Sildenafil
for some reason it not the quality of your writing that counted, but your ability to write as close as possible to 3000 words on a topic!

For those of you who feel the pain of word-limit assessment, or are simply interested in knowing how many words are in a document, Word 2007 makes it easier for you.

Firstly, you do not have to go looking for the word count feature.  In Word 2003 and previous versions, word count was hidden in the menu structure.  That is no more.

Word count now appears in the bottom left hand corner of the Word 2007 interface.  As you type, it will automatically update with the current word count.

But what if you want to know how many words are in a selection of text that you just made?  Simple.  Just select your text, and look back at the bottom left hand corner of the screen.  Word displays both the number of words in the selected text, and the total number of words in the document.

Finally if you want detailed statistics on the number of pages, words, paragraphs, characters (with and without spaces), and the number of lines in your document, simply click on the word count box which we have been talking about during this article.  A word count dialog box will appear with all the statistics you need.

Until next time!

TNP 🙂

[tags]Word 2007, Microsoft Office 2007, Word Count, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

For many, tablets
students particularly, try
word count is a very important feature in Word.  I remember the good old days when back at Paperclip school.  When completing school assignments, Sildenafil
for some reason it not the quality of your writing that counted, but your ability to write as close as possible to 3000 words on a topic!

For those of you who feel the pain of word-limit assessment, or are simply interested in knowing how many words are in a document, Word 2007 makes it easier for you.

Firstly, you do not have to go looking for the word count feature.  In Word 2003 and previous versions, word count was hidden in the menu structure.  That is no more.

Word count now appears in the bottom left hand corner of the Word 2007 interface.  As you type, it will automatically update with the current word count.

But what if you want to know how many words are in a selection of text that you just made?  Simple.  Just select your text, and look back at the bottom left hand corner of the screen.  Word displays both the number of words in the selected text, and the total number of words in the document.

Finally if you want detailed statistics on the number of pages, words, paragraphs, characters (with and without spaces), and the number of lines in your document, simply click on the word count box which we have been talking about during this article.  A word count dialog box will appear with all the statistics you need.

Until next time!

TNP 🙂

[tags]Word 2007, Microsoft Office 2007, Word Count, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!  Enjoy 🙂

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP 🙂

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in 🙂

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP 🙂

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture 🙂

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) 🙂

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between