What is included in Microsoft Office Professional 2007?

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

For many, tablets
students particularly, try
word count is a very important feature in Word.  I remember the good old days when back at Paperclip school.  When completing school assignments, Sildenafil
for some reason it not the quality of your writing that counted, but your ability to write as close as possible to 3000 words on a topic!

For those of you who feel the pain of word-limit assessment, or are simply interested in knowing how many words are in a document, Word 2007 makes it easier for you.

Firstly, you do not have to go looking for the word count feature.  In Word 2003 and previous versions, word count was hidden in the menu structure.  That is no more.

Word count now appears in the bottom left hand corner of the Word 2007 interface.  As you type, it will automatically update with the current word count.

But what if you want to know how many words are in a selection of text that you just made?  Simple.  Just select your text, and look back at the bottom left hand corner of the screen.  Word displays both the number of words in the selected text, and the total number of words in the document.

Finally if you want detailed statistics on the number of pages, words, paragraphs, characters (with and without spaces), and the number of lines in your document, simply click on the word count box which we have been talking about during this article.  A word count dialog box will appear with all the statistics you need.

Until next time!

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Microsoft Office 2007, Word Count, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

A number of people have asked me…

The New Paperclip… I made a big mistake, purchase
now how do I undo my changes in Word 2007?

Thanks for the questions… yes the Undo command has moved a little from previous versions of Word.  You can now find Undo (as well as Redo and Repeat) in the Quick Access Toolbar.  The Quick Access Toolbar lives in the top left hand corner of the screen.  Have a look at the image below, I have circled Undo so you know where it is for next time.

Note that you will also find Undo in the same spot (in the Quick Access Toolbar) in PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007 πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Undo, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

A number of people have asked me…

The New Paperclip… I made a big mistake, purchase
now how do I undo my changes in Word 2007?

Thanks for the questions… yes the Undo command has moved a little from previous versions of Word.  You can now find Undo (as well as Redo and Repeat) in the Quick Access Toolbar.  The Quick Access Toolbar lives in the top left hand corner of the screen.  Have a look at the image below, I have circled Undo so you know where it is for next time.

Note that you will also find Undo in the same spot (in the Quick Access Toolbar) in PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007 πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Undo, Tutorial[/tags]

Lets have a deep and meaningful look at how we make changes to the page layout in Microsoft Office Word 2007.

Where do you find all the Page Layout buttons?

Simply click on the “Page Layout” tab in the new Ribbon menu system.  By clicking on the Page Layout tab, hospital the Ribbon displays all the functionality you need to be able to change the key page layout and formatting aspects of your document!

What can I do with the Page Layout?

Good question!  By default (in Word 2007 Beta 2, apoplexy although it will be similar in the final retail release) there are five groups of features which you can use to change the look and feel of your document… They are:

  • Themes
  • Page Setup
  • Page Background
  • Paragraph
  • Arrange

Lets have a closer look at each one.

Themes

Themes enable you to very quickly and easily change the look and feel of the entire document to a specific theme style.  There are many different themes included in Word 2007 (and PowerPoint 2007 as well), ampoule and in fact by default when you create a new document, you are actually using a theme (the ‘Office’ theme).  If you are tired of the look of the themes that come with Word 2007, you can download more from Microsoft Office Online!

A theme specifies the fonts to be used, the colour palette, and the styling of graphics.  If you only want to use one aspect of the theme, you can!  Just select the palette, font or styling from one of the three galleries in the Themes group.

Page Setup

Page setup includes all the features you need to change your margins, the orientation of the paper (portrait or landscape), the size of the paper, the number of columns on the page, as well as breaks, line numbers and hyphenation!  To change all those features, simply click on the button associated with what you want to change, and select your preferred option from the gallery.

If you want more granular control over the page setup, click on the small icon in the bottom right hand corner of the page setup group, which looks like a small square with an arrow pointing out of it.

Page Background

In the Page Background group, you can add a watermark to your document, change the page color, or make your document look great with a page border.  A watermark is a grayed out image or text which appears in the background of your document.  For example, you could have the word ‘draft’ in the background of your document, so everyone reading knew that it was still a draft.

Again, simply select your watermark or colour from the gallery when you click on the button.

Paragraph

The paragraph group is where you can modify all the aspects of the paragraphs that appear in your document.  Indent essentially changes the margins for the paragraph.  You can set the left indent, or the right indent, and the distance is measured in inches.

Spacing is similar to indent, however you are changing the spacing before, or after a paragraph.  Spacing is measured in points (just like font size).

Again, for more granular control, click on the button in the bottom right hand corner of the group for more functionality.

Arrange

The arrange group allows you to control how objects interact with the text in your document.  For example, if you have a text box in your document, you can use the arrange group to:

  • Set the position of the text box
  • Bring it to the front (in front of other objects)
  • Send it to the back (behind other objects)
  • Set the text wrapping around the text box
  • Set the alignment of the text box
  • Group the text box with other text boxes
  • Rotate the text box.

Again, more granular control is available via the button in the bottom right hand corner of the arrange group.

Want to learn more?

So there you have it, a deep dive tutorial into the Page Layout tab in Microsoft Office Word 2007.  For more Word 2007 tutorials, tips and techniques, check out the Word 2007 category on www.thenewpaperclip.com 

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Layout[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

A number of people have asked me…

The New Paperclip… I made a big mistake, purchase
now how do I undo my changes in Word 2007?

Thanks for the questions… yes the Undo command has moved a little from previous versions of Word.  You can now find Undo (as well as Redo and Repeat) in the Quick Access Toolbar.  The Quick Access Toolbar lives in the top left hand corner of the screen.  Have a look at the image below, I have circled Undo so you know where it is for next time.

Note that you will also find Undo in the same spot (in the Quick Access Toolbar) in PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007 πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Undo, Tutorial[/tags]

Lets have a deep and meaningful look at how we make changes to the page layout in Microsoft Office Word 2007.

Where do you find all the Page Layout buttons?

Simply click on the “Page Layout” tab in the new Ribbon menu system.  By clicking on the Page Layout tab, hospital the Ribbon displays all the functionality you need to be able to change the key page layout and formatting aspects of your document!

What can I do with the Page Layout?

Good question!  By default (in Word 2007 Beta 2, apoplexy although it will be similar in the final retail release) there are five groups of features which you can use to change the look and feel of your document… They are:

  • Themes
  • Page Setup
  • Page Background
  • Paragraph
  • Arrange

Lets have a closer look at each one.

Themes

Themes enable you to very quickly and easily change the look and feel of the entire document to a specific theme style.  There are many different themes included in Word 2007 (and PowerPoint 2007 as well), ampoule and in fact by default when you create a new document, you are actually using a theme (the ‘Office’ theme).  If you are tired of the look of the themes that come with Word 2007, you can download more from Microsoft Office Online!

A theme specifies the fonts to be used, the colour palette, and the styling of graphics.  If you only want to use one aspect of the theme, you can!  Just select the palette, font or styling from one of the three galleries in the Themes group.

Page Setup

Page setup includes all the features you need to change your margins, the orientation of the paper (portrait or landscape), the size of the paper, the number of columns on the page, as well as breaks, line numbers and hyphenation!  To change all those features, simply click on the button associated with what you want to change, and select your preferred option from the gallery.

If you want more granular control over the page setup, click on the small icon in the bottom right hand corner of the page setup group, which looks like a small square with an arrow pointing out of it.

Page Background

In the Page Background group, you can add a watermark to your document, change the page color, or make your document look great with a page border.  A watermark is a grayed out image or text which appears in the background of your document.  For example, you could have the word ‘draft’ in the background of your document, so everyone reading knew that it was still a draft.

Again, simply select your watermark or colour from the gallery when you click on the button.

Paragraph

The paragraph group is where you can modify all the aspects of the paragraphs that appear in your document.  Indent essentially changes the margins for the paragraph.  You can set the left indent, or the right indent, and the distance is measured in inches.

Spacing is similar to indent, however you are changing the spacing before, or after a paragraph.  Spacing is measured in points (just like font size).

Again, for more granular control, click on the button in the bottom right hand corner of the group for more functionality.

Arrange

The arrange group allows you to control how objects interact with the text in your document.  For example, if you have a text box in your document, you can use the arrange group to:

  • Set the position of the text box
  • Bring it to the front (in front of other objects)
  • Send it to the back (behind other objects)
  • Set the text wrapping around the text box
  • Set the alignment of the text box
  • Group the text box with other text boxes
  • Rotate the text box.

Again, more granular control is available via the button in the bottom right hand corner of the arrange group.

Want to learn more?

So there you have it, a deep dive tutorial into the Page Layout tab in Microsoft Office Word 2007.  For more Word 2007 tutorials, tips and techniques, check out the Word 2007 category on www.thenewpaperclip.com 

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Layout[/tags]

Don’t like the ribbon?  Well there is a way to make Word 2007 look and feel just like the good old days back with Word 97!

If you want to throw away a decades worth of user interface innovation, website check out this post from Alistair Speirs, shop where he talks about how you can use the Quick Access Toolbar to take you back to the year which brought us “Titanic”, this “Men in Black”, “The Fifth Element”, and the often forgotten “Power Rangers Turbo: The Movie”

[tags]Word 2007, User Interface, Power Rangers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

A number of people have asked me…

The New Paperclip… I made a big mistake, purchase
now how do I undo my changes in Word 2007?

Thanks for the questions… yes the Undo command has moved a little from previous versions of Word.  You can now find Undo (as well as Redo and Repeat) in the Quick Access Toolbar.  The Quick Access Toolbar lives in the top left hand corner of the screen.  Have a look at the image below, I have circled Undo so you know where it is for next time.

Note that you will also find Undo in the same spot (in the Quick Access Toolbar) in PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007 πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Undo, Tutorial[/tags]

Lets have a deep and meaningful look at how we make changes to the page layout in Microsoft Office Word 2007.

Where do you find all the Page Layout buttons?

Simply click on the “Page Layout” tab in the new Ribbon menu system.  By clicking on the Page Layout tab, hospital the Ribbon displays all the functionality you need to be able to change the key page layout and formatting aspects of your document!

What can I do with the Page Layout?

Good question!  By default (in Word 2007 Beta 2, apoplexy although it will be similar in the final retail release) there are five groups of features which you can use to change the look and feel of your document… They are:

  • Themes
  • Page Setup
  • Page Background
  • Paragraph
  • Arrange

Lets have a closer look at each one.

Themes

Themes enable you to very quickly and easily change the look and feel of the entire document to a specific theme style.  There are many different themes included in Word 2007 (and PowerPoint 2007 as well), ampoule and in fact by default when you create a new document, you are actually using a theme (the ‘Office’ theme).  If you are tired of the look of the themes that come with Word 2007, you can download more from Microsoft Office Online!

A theme specifies the fonts to be used, the colour palette, and the styling of graphics.  If you only want to use one aspect of the theme, you can!  Just select the palette, font or styling from one of the three galleries in the Themes group.

Page Setup

Page setup includes all the features you need to change your margins, the orientation of the paper (portrait or landscape), the size of the paper, the number of columns on the page, as well as breaks, line numbers and hyphenation!  To change all those features, simply click on the button associated with what you want to change, and select your preferred option from the gallery.

If you want more granular control over the page setup, click on the small icon in the bottom right hand corner of the page setup group, which looks like a small square with an arrow pointing out of it.

Page Background

In the Page Background group, you can add a watermark to your document, change the page color, or make your document look great with a page border.  A watermark is a grayed out image or text which appears in the background of your document.  For example, you could have the word ‘draft’ in the background of your document, so everyone reading knew that it was still a draft.

Again, simply select your watermark or colour from the gallery when you click on the button.

Paragraph

The paragraph group is where you can modify all the aspects of the paragraphs that appear in your document.  Indent essentially changes the margins for the paragraph.  You can set the left indent, or the right indent, and the distance is measured in inches.

Spacing is similar to indent, however you are changing the spacing before, or after a paragraph.  Spacing is measured in points (just like font size).

Again, for more granular control, click on the button in the bottom right hand corner of the group for more functionality.

Arrange

The arrange group allows you to control how objects interact with the text in your document.  For example, if you have a text box in your document, you can use the arrange group to:

  • Set the position of the text box
  • Bring it to the front (in front of other objects)
  • Send it to the back (behind other objects)
  • Set the text wrapping around the text box
  • Set the alignment of the text box
  • Group the text box with other text boxes
  • Rotate the text box.

Again, more granular control is available via the button in the bottom right hand corner of the arrange group.

Want to learn more?

So there you have it, a deep dive tutorial into the Page Layout tab in Microsoft Office Word 2007.  For more Word 2007 tutorials, tips and techniques, check out the Word 2007 category on www.thenewpaperclip.com 

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Layout[/tags]

Don’t like the ribbon?  Well there is a way to make Word 2007 look and feel just like the good old days back with Word 97!

If you want to throw away a decades worth of user interface innovation, website check out this post from Alistair Speirs, shop where he talks about how you can use the Quick Access Toolbar to take you back to the year which brought us “Titanic”, this “Men in Black”, “The Fifth Element”, and the often forgotten “Power Rangers Turbo: The Movie”

[tags]Word 2007, User Interface, Power Rangers[/tags]

Glad you asked!  Groove is one of those tools (like OneNote), decease that at first you think… why would I use that, but once you start, you realise that your life would suck without it!

What is Groove 2007?

Groove in the broadest sense is a piece of software which allows you to collaborate with people.  But not just people in your workplace, but your business partners, customers, or anyone you want!  The best part is that you do not need the IT department to create a site for you, or open up ports in the firewall, or actually be online to use it!  That’s right, you can be offline (away from the network) and still access a local copy of your collaborative workspace.  Once you log back on, Groove will sync the workspace with all of your colleagues.

But why would I want to use it?

Ever dealt with customers via email (if you answered yes, then go purchase Groove 2007 licenses now, and read the rest of this whilst you wait for them to arrive!).  Do documents get lost in the email, or do you find it hard to keep track of what you have shared with each customer?  Why not build a secure workspace, invite your customer to participate, and then collaborate!  You both have a secure place to share documents, chat about ideas, and send and receive messages.  I like to call it unstructured structured collaboration (if you get my drift).

Personally I use Groove all the time… so I will focus my next few posts on how you can take advantage of this great product to bring your friends close, and your customers closer!

[tags]Groove 2007, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

A number of people have asked me…

The New Paperclip… I made a big mistake, purchase
now how do I undo my changes in Word 2007?

Thanks for the questions… yes the Undo command has moved a little from previous versions of Word.  You can now find Undo (as well as Redo and Repeat) in the Quick Access Toolbar.  The Quick Access Toolbar lives in the top left hand corner of the screen.  Have a look at the image below, I have circled Undo so you know where it is for next time.

Note that you will also find Undo in the same spot (in the Quick Access Toolbar) in PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007 πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Undo, Tutorial[/tags]

Lets have a deep and meaningful look at how we make changes to the page layout in Microsoft Office Word 2007.

Where do you find all the Page Layout buttons?

Simply click on the “Page Layout” tab in the new Ribbon menu system.  By clicking on the Page Layout tab, hospital the Ribbon displays all the functionality you need to be able to change the key page layout and formatting aspects of your document!

What can I do with the Page Layout?

Good question!  By default (in Word 2007 Beta 2, apoplexy although it will be similar in the final retail release) there are five groups of features which you can use to change the look and feel of your document… They are:

  • Themes
  • Page Setup
  • Page Background
  • Paragraph
  • Arrange

Lets have a closer look at each one.

Themes

Themes enable you to very quickly and easily change the look and feel of the entire document to a specific theme style.  There are many different themes included in Word 2007 (and PowerPoint 2007 as well), ampoule and in fact by default when you create a new document, you are actually using a theme (the ‘Office’ theme).  If you are tired of the look of the themes that come with Word 2007, you can download more from Microsoft Office Online!

A theme specifies the fonts to be used, the colour palette, and the styling of graphics.  If you only want to use one aspect of the theme, you can!  Just select the palette, font or styling from one of the three galleries in the Themes group.

Page Setup

Page setup includes all the features you need to change your margins, the orientation of the paper (portrait or landscape), the size of the paper, the number of columns on the page, as well as breaks, line numbers and hyphenation!  To change all those features, simply click on the button associated with what you want to change, and select your preferred option from the gallery.

If you want more granular control over the page setup, click on the small icon in the bottom right hand corner of the page setup group, which looks like a small square with an arrow pointing out of it.

Page Background

In the Page Background group, you can add a watermark to your document, change the page color, or make your document look great with a page border.  A watermark is a grayed out image or text which appears in the background of your document.  For example, you could have the word ‘draft’ in the background of your document, so everyone reading knew that it was still a draft.

Again, simply select your watermark or colour from the gallery when you click on the button.

Paragraph

The paragraph group is where you can modify all the aspects of the paragraphs that appear in your document.  Indent essentially changes the margins for the paragraph.  You can set the left indent, or the right indent, and the distance is measured in inches.

Spacing is similar to indent, however you are changing the spacing before, or after a paragraph.  Spacing is measured in points (just like font size).

Again, for more granular control, click on the button in the bottom right hand corner of the group for more functionality.

Arrange

The arrange group allows you to control how objects interact with the text in your document.  For example, if you have a text box in your document, you can use the arrange group to:

  • Set the position of the text box
  • Bring it to the front (in front of other objects)
  • Send it to the back (behind other objects)
  • Set the text wrapping around the text box
  • Set the alignment of the text box
  • Group the text box with other text boxes
  • Rotate the text box.

Again, more granular control is available via the button in the bottom right hand corner of the arrange group.

Want to learn more?

So there you have it, a deep dive tutorial into the Page Layout tab in Microsoft Office Word 2007.  For more Word 2007 tutorials, tips and techniques, check out the Word 2007 category on www.thenewpaperclip.com 

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Layout[/tags]

Don’t like the ribbon?  Well there is a way to make Word 2007 look and feel just like the good old days back with Word 97!

If you want to throw away a decades worth of user interface innovation, website check out this post from Alistair Speirs, shop where he talks about how you can use the Quick Access Toolbar to take you back to the year which brought us “Titanic”, this “Men in Black”, “The Fifth Element”, and the often forgotten “Power Rangers Turbo: The Movie”

[tags]Word 2007, User Interface, Power Rangers[/tags]

Glad you asked!  Groove is one of those tools (like OneNote), decease that at first you think… why would I use that, but once you start, you realise that your life would suck without it!

What is Groove 2007?

Groove in the broadest sense is a piece of software which allows you to collaborate with people.  But not just people in your workplace, but your business partners, customers, or anyone you want!  The best part is that you do not need the IT department to create a site for you, or open up ports in the firewall, or actually be online to use it!  That’s right, you can be offline (away from the network) and still access a local copy of your collaborative workspace.  Once you log back on, Groove will sync the workspace with all of your colleagues.

But why would I want to use it?

Ever dealt with customers via email (if you answered yes, then go purchase Groove 2007 licenses now, and read the rest of this whilst you wait for them to arrive!).  Do documents get lost in the email, or do you find it hard to keep track of what you have shared with each customer?  Why not build a secure workspace, invite your customer to participate, and then collaborate!  You both have a secure place to share documents, chat about ideas, and send and receive messages.  I like to call it unstructured structured collaboration (if you get my drift).

Personally I use Groove all the time… so I will focus my next few posts on how you can take advantage of this great product to bring your friends close, and your customers closer!

[tags]Groove 2007, Tutorial[/tags]

Glad you asked!  Groove is one of those tools (like OneNote), decease that at first you think… why would I use that, but once you start, you realise that your life would suck without it!

What is Groove 2007?

Groove in the broadest sense is a piece of software which allows you to collaborate with people.  But not just people in your workplace, but your business partners, customers, or anyone you want!  The best part is that you do not need the IT department to create a site for you, or open up ports in the firewall, or actually be online to use it!  That’s right, you can be offline (away from the network) and still access a local copy of your collaborative workspace.  Once you log back on, Groove will sync the workspace with all of your colleagues.

But why would I want to use it?

Ever dealt with customers via email (if you answered yes, then go purchase Groove 2007 licenses now, and read the rest of this whilst you wait for them to arrive!).  Do documents get lost in the email, or do you find it hard to keep track of what you have shared with each customer?  Why not build a secure workspace, invite your customer to participate, and then collaborate!  You both have a secure place to share documents, chat about ideas, and send and receive messages.  I like to call it unstructured structured collaboration (if you get my drift).

Personally I use Groove all the time… so I will focus my next few posts on how you can take advantage of this great product to bring your friends close, and your customers closer!

[tags]Groove 2007, Tutorial[/tags]

The first thing you will want to do (after setting up your Groove account) is to create a workspace, website like this
so you can start collaborating.

There are a few options to choose from when creating your workspace, denture
depending on what you plan to collaborate about.

The Standard Groove 2007 Workspace

The Standard Groove 2007 Workspace includes a Files tool and a Discussion tool.  You can add more options later, viagra buy
but this is basically your bare bones collaboration space.

To create a standard workspace, click on “Create new Workspace” from the Groove Launchbar, type in the name of your workspace, ensure the “Standard” radio button is selected, and then click ok.

The File Sharing Groove 2007 Workspace

Using the File Sharing workspace, you can synchronize a windows folder across different computers.  The best part is that you can access the synchronized folder from any Windows Application.

To create a file sharing workspace, click on “Create new Workspace” from the Groove Launchbar, type in the name of your workspace, ensure the “File Sharing” radio button is selected, then click ok.

Groove 2007 Workspace Templates

If you have a specialized project or task you want to collaborate on, there are many different templates available for free which you can use.  To browse the available templates, click on “Create new Workspace” from the Groove Launchbar, and then select “Browse Templates”

This will take you to a webpage which lists a number of different templates grouped by the type of business you are in (Enterprise, Government or Small Business), or the specific function you are after.  The one I am most excited about is the “Annual Marketing Programs” template, which allows you go keep track of all the marketing programs you have on the go across a distributed marketing team!!!

The other option here is to create your own custom workspace, which could include any of the following tools:

  • Calendar – for marking dates
  • Chess Game – for building team morale
  • Discussion – for conversations
  • Files – for storing stuff
  • Forms – for collecting and viewing data
  • InfoPath Forms – for collecting and viewing data
  • Issue Tracking – for the status of issues and incidents
  • Meetings – for the management of agendas, action items etc.
  • Notepad – for editing text
  • Pictures – for sharing graphics, photos etc
  • SharePoint Files – for synchronizing with a SharePoint library
  • Sketchpad – for drawing stuff

Which option should I choose?

If you are just starting out, I would create a standard workspace.  This way you get used to the basic functionality of Groove 2007, and understand how it works without the complexity of added features.  Once you have the basics nailed, go straight for the workspace templates and start collaborating!

[tags]Groove 2007, Workspace, Collaboration[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

A number of people have asked me…

The New Paperclip… I made a big mistake, purchase
now how do I undo my changes in Word 2007?

Thanks for the questions… yes the Undo command has moved a little from previous versions of Word.  You can now find Undo (as well as Redo and Repeat) in the Quick Access Toolbar.  The Quick Access Toolbar lives in the top left hand corner of the screen.  Have a look at the image below, I have circled Undo so you know where it is for next time.

Note that you will also find Undo in the same spot (in the Quick Access Toolbar) in PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007 πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Undo, Tutorial[/tags]

Lets have a deep and meaningful look at how we make changes to the page layout in Microsoft Office Word 2007.

Where do you find all the Page Layout buttons?

Simply click on the “Page Layout” tab in the new Ribbon menu system.  By clicking on the Page Layout tab, hospital the Ribbon displays all the functionality you need to be able to change the key page layout and formatting aspects of your document!

What can I do with the Page Layout?

Good question!  By default (in Word 2007 Beta 2, apoplexy although it will be similar in the final retail release) there are five groups of features which you can use to change the look and feel of your document… They are:

  • Themes
  • Page Setup
  • Page Background
  • Paragraph
  • Arrange

Lets have a closer look at each one.

Themes

Themes enable you to very quickly and easily change the look and feel of the entire document to a specific theme style.  There are many different themes included in Word 2007 (and PowerPoint 2007 as well), ampoule and in fact by default when you create a new document, you are actually using a theme (the ‘Office’ theme).  If you are tired of the look of the themes that come with Word 2007, you can download more from Microsoft Office Online!

A theme specifies the fonts to be used, the colour palette, and the styling of graphics.  If you only want to use one aspect of the theme, you can!  Just select the palette, font or styling from one of the three galleries in the Themes group.

Page Setup

Page setup includes all the features you need to change your margins, the orientation of the paper (portrait or landscape), the size of the paper, the number of columns on the page, as well as breaks, line numbers and hyphenation!  To change all those features, simply click on the button associated with what you want to change, and select your preferred option from the gallery.

If you want more granular control over the page setup, click on the small icon in the bottom right hand corner of the page setup group, which looks like a small square with an arrow pointing out of it.

Page Background

In the Page Background group, you can add a watermark to your document, change the page color, or make your document look great with a page border.  A watermark is a grayed out image or text which appears in the background of your document.  For example, you could have the word ‘draft’ in the background of your document, so everyone reading knew that it was still a draft.

Again, simply select your watermark or colour from the gallery when you click on the button.

Paragraph

The paragraph group is where you can modify all the aspects of the paragraphs that appear in your document.  Indent essentially changes the margins for the paragraph.  You can set the left indent, or the right indent, and the distance is measured in inches.

Spacing is similar to indent, however you are changing the spacing before, or after a paragraph.  Spacing is measured in points (just like font size).

Again, for more granular control, click on the button in the bottom right hand corner of the group for more functionality.

Arrange

The arrange group allows you to control how objects interact with the text in your document.  For example, if you have a text box in your document, you can use the arrange group to:

  • Set the position of the text box
  • Bring it to the front (in front of other objects)
  • Send it to the back (behind other objects)
  • Set the text wrapping around the text box
  • Set the alignment of the text box
  • Group the text box with other text boxes
  • Rotate the text box.

Again, more granular control is available via the button in the bottom right hand corner of the arrange group.

Want to learn more?

So there you have it, a deep dive tutorial into the Page Layout tab in Microsoft Office Word 2007.  For more Word 2007 tutorials, tips and techniques, check out the Word 2007 category on www.thenewpaperclip.com 

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Layout[/tags]

Don’t like the ribbon?  Well there is a way to make Word 2007 look and feel just like the good old days back with Word 97!

If you want to throw away a decades worth of user interface innovation, website check out this post from Alistair Speirs, shop where he talks about how you can use the Quick Access Toolbar to take you back to the year which brought us “Titanic”, this “Men in Black”, “The Fifth Element”, and the often forgotten “Power Rangers Turbo: The Movie”

[tags]Word 2007, User Interface, Power Rangers[/tags]

Glad you asked!  Groove is one of those tools (like OneNote), decease that at first you think… why would I use that, but once you start, you realise that your life would suck without it!

What is Groove 2007?

Groove in the broadest sense is a piece of software which allows you to collaborate with people.  But not just people in your workplace, but your business partners, customers, or anyone you want!  The best part is that you do not need the IT department to create a site for you, or open up ports in the firewall, or actually be online to use it!  That’s right, you can be offline (away from the network) and still access a local copy of your collaborative workspace.  Once you log back on, Groove will sync the workspace with all of your colleagues.

But why would I want to use it?

Ever dealt with customers via email (if you answered yes, then go purchase Groove 2007 licenses now, and read the rest of this whilst you wait for them to arrive!).  Do documents get lost in the email, or do you find it hard to keep track of what you have shared with each customer?  Why not build a secure workspace, invite your customer to participate, and then collaborate!  You both have a secure place to share documents, chat about ideas, and send and receive messages.  I like to call it unstructured structured collaboration (if you get my drift).

Personally I use Groove all the time… so I will focus my next few posts on how you can take advantage of this great product to bring your friends close, and your customers closer!

[tags]Groove 2007, Tutorial[/tags]

Glad you asked!  Groove is one of those tools (like OneNote), decease that at first you think… why would I use that, but once you start, you realise that your life would suck without it!

What is Groove 2007?

Groove in the broadest sense is a piece of software which allows you to collaborate with people.  But not just people in your workplace, but your business partners, customers, or anyone you want!  The best part is that you do not need the IT department to create a site for you, or open up ports in the firewall, or actually be online to use it!  That’s right, you can be offline (away from the network) and still access a local copy of your collaborative workspace.  Once you log back on, Groove will sync the workspace with all of your colleagues.

But why would I want to use it?

Ever dealt with customers via email (if you answered yes, then go purchase Groove 2007 licenses now, and read the rest of this whilst you wait for them to arrive!).  Do documents get lost in the email, or do you find it hard to keep track of what you have shared with each customer?  Why not build a secure workspace, invite your customer to participate, and then collaborate!  You both have a secure place to share documents, chat about ideas, and send and receive messages.  I like to call it unstructured structured collaboration (if you get my drift).

Personally I use Groove all the time… so I will focus my next few posts on how you can take advantage of this great product to bring your friends close, and your customers closer!

[tags]Groove 2007, Tutorial[/tags]

The first thing you will want to do (after setting up your Groove account) is to create a workspace, website like this
so you can start collaborating.

There are a few options to choose from when creating your workspace, denture
depending on what you plan to collaborate about.

The Standard Groove 2007 Workspace

The Standard Groove 2007 Workspace includes a Files tool and a Discussion tool.  You can add more options later, viagra buy
but this is basically your bare bones collaboration space.

To create a standard workspace, click on “Create new Workspace” from the Groove Launchbar, type in the name of your workspace, ensure the “Standard” radio button is selected, and then click ok.

The File Sharing Groove 2007 Workspace

Using the File Sharing workspace, you can synchronize a windows folder across different computers.  The best part is that you can access the synchronized folder from any Windows Application.

To create a file sharing workspace, click on “Create new Workspace” from the Groove Launchbar, type in the name of your workspace, ensure the “File Sharing” radio button is selected, then click ok.

Groove 2007 Workspace Templates

If you have a specialized project or task you want to collaborate on, there are many different templates available for free which you can use.  To browse the available templates, click on “Create new Workspace” from the Groove Launchbar, and then select “Browse Templates”

This will take you to a webpage which lists a number of different templates grouped by the type of business you are in (Enterprise, Government or Small Business), or the specific function you are after.  The one I am most excited about is the “Annual Marketing Programs” template, which allows you go keep track of all the marketing programs you have on the go across a distributed marketing team!!!

The other option here is to create your own custom workspace, which could include any of the following tools:

  • Calendar – for marking dates
  • Chess Game – for building team morale
  • Discussion – for conversations
  • Files – for storing stuff
  • Forms – for collecting and viewing data
  • InfoPath Forms – for collecting and viewing data
  • Issue Tracking – for the status of issues and incidents
  • Meetings – for the management of agendas, action items etc.
  • Notepad – for editing text
  • Pictures – for sharing graphics, photos etc
  • SharePoint Files – for synchronizing with a SharePoint library
  • Sketchpad – for drawing stuff

Which option should I choose?

If you are just starting out, I would create a standard workspace.  This way you get used to the basic functionality of Groove 2007, and understand how it works without the complexity of added features.  Once you have the basics nailed, go straight for the workspace templates and start collaborating!

[tags]Groove 2007, Workspace, Collaboration[/tags]

Groove 2007 is a fantastic tool to use to get closer to your customers, abortion suppliers or colleagues.  I know that as more people understand exactly what you can achieve with Groove, buy viagra it will take off like a wild fire.

One example of functionality which has definite business value is the ability to manage meetings.  Let me take you through a quick tutorial on how to use the meeting tool in Microsoft Office Groove 2007

1) Add the meeting tool to your workspace

In the common tasks section on the right hand side of your screen, side effects there is an option to ‘Add Tools’.  Click on this, and then select the ‘Meetings’ tool from the list of tools presented.  Click ‘OK’

What you are presented with is a new tab in your Groove Workspace, called ‘Meetings’.  You can see what it looks like in the screen shot below.

From this view you can manage all the meetings you have with your collaboration partner (whether they be a customer, supplier, strategic partner or colleague)

2) Create a new meeting

To create a new meeting in Groove 2007, click on ‘New Meeting’ in the top left hand corner of the meeting tool.  Once you click new meeting, the ‘Meeting Wizard’ dialogue appears.

Simply fill in the specific details of the meeting, including the subject, start and finish times, the location, and the details of the meeting.  You can also attach files to the meeting by clicking on the paperclip in the bottom left hand corner of the wizard.  Click ok when you are finished.  Once you have created your meeting, you can then go back to the meeting tool and mange your meetings from there. 

3) Manage the meeting

From the meetings tool you can select your attendees for your meeting.  Attendees are only restricted to members of the workspace.  From the attendees tab, you can select who should attend the meeting, whether or not they are the chairperson or the minutes taker, and any notes you want to pass on to them.

From the meetings tool you can also manage the meeting agenda.  Select the agenda tab, then click ‘New Topic’.  From this dialog box you can add the subject for your agenda topic, the presenter, the duration and the details of the topic.  Again like the meeting itself, you can add files or other attachments using the paperclip in the bottom left hand corner of the box.

During your meeting, you can take minutes for each of your agenda items by clicking on the minutes tab.  Simply type the notes for each agenda item as you go.

Finally to manage the action items which come out of the meeting, click the actions tab, and add new action items as appropriate.

Conclusion

The best thing about the meetings tool in Groove 2007 is that everyone has the same record of the meeting and its outcomes, straight after the meeting (no need to wait for the secretary to send out the minutes after she/he types them up).  If you invite someone new into the workspace, they can see the history of all previous meetings as well.

One great example of removing the human latency out of collaboration!  Now that is business value!!!

[tags]Groove 2007, Business Value, Meetings, Collaboration[/tags]

A colleague of mine came running over to my desk the other day in quite a pickle!  He said “The New Paperclip… how on Earth do I name a range in Excel 2007?”

“Simple my friend” I replied.  Little did he know that I have no idea where it was, about it more about but I put my faith into the beauty that is the Ribbon to figure it out.

For the uninitiated, Naming a range is a great tool you can use in Excel.  It allows you to give a descriptive name to a range (like ‘Expenses’) instead of using the normal notation like (A10:A25).  Very handy if you work with quite a few formulas in a sheet.

So back to solving the problem.  Firstly, why would you name a range in Excel?  The answer is to make it easier to work with formulas.  So straight away I went looking for the Formulas tab in the Ribbon.  And there it was, a whole section on Named cells, which included the Name Manager (which enables you to control all the name references you have added to your workbook), Name a Range, and a few other Name functions.

Problem solved, in about 3 seconds flat.  The Ribbon is definitely going to make people more productive, just as long as they start thinking in a “Results Orientated” way.  Not too much of a shift if you ask me!

[tags]Excel 2007, Named Range[/tags]

A colleague of mine came running over to my desk the other day in quite a pickle!  He said “The New Paperclip… how on Earth do I name a range in Excel 2007?”

“Simple my friend” I replied.  Little did he know that I have no idea where it was, about it more about but I put my faith into the beauty that is the Ribbon to figure it out.

For the uninitiated, Naming a range is a great tool you can use in Excel.  It allows you to give a descriptive name to a range (like ‘Expenses’) instead of using the normal notation like (A10:A25).  Very handy if you work with quite a few formulas in a sheet.

So back to solving the problem.  Firstly, why would you name a range in Excel?  The answer is to make it easier to work with formulas.  So straight away I went looking for the Formulas tab in the Ribbon.  And there it was, a whole section on Named cells, which included the Name Manager (which enables you to control all the name references you have added to your workbook), Name a Range, and a few other Name functions.

Problem solved, in about 3 seconds flat.  The Ribbon is definitely going to make people more productive, just as long as they start thinking in a “Results Orientated” way.  Not too much of a shift if you ask me!

[tags]Excel 2007, Named Range[/tags]

There are a fewΒ screencasts starting to appear on the Microsoft Office 2007 Developer Center.

For those ofΒ you who don’t know what screencasts are, adiposity they are basically videos showing you exactly how to do something in an application.

This screencast details exactly how to extend the Office 2007 UI by building a custom ribbon!Β  Great if you want to customise the ribbon inΒ Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007, or Outlook 2007 with some menu options specific to your business, or your business systems.

[tags]Screencast, Ribbon, Office 2007[/tags]

A colleague of mine came running over to my desk the other day in quite a pickle!  He said “The New Paperclip… how on Earth do I name a range in Excel 2007?”

“Simple my friend” I replied.  Little did he know that I have no idea where it was, about it more about but I put my faith into the beauty that is the Ribbon to figure it out.

For the uninitiated, Naming a range is a great tool you can use in Excel.  It allows you to give a descriptive name to a range (like ‘Expenses’) instead of using the normal notation like (A10:A25).  Very handy if you work with quite a few formulas in a sheet.

So back to solving the problem.  Firstly, why would you name a range in Excel?  The answer is to make it easier to work with formulas.  So straight away I went looking for the Formulas tab in the Ribbon.  And there it was, a whole section on Named cells, which included the Name Manager (which enables you to control all the name references you have added to your workbook), Name a Range, and a few other Name functions.

Problem solved, in about 3 seconds flat.  The Ribbon is definitely going to make people more productive, just as long as they start thinking in a “Results Orientated” way.  Not too much of a shift if you ask me!

[tags]Excel 2007, Named Range[/tags]

There are a fewΒ screencasts starting to appear on the Microsoft Office 2007 Developer Center.

For those ofΒ you who don’t know what screencasts are, adiposity they are basically videos showing you exactly how to do something in an application.

This screencast details exactly how to extend the Office 2007 UI by building a custom ribbon!Β  Great if you want to customise the ribbon inΒ Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007, or Outlook 2007 with some menu options specific to your business, or your business systems.

[tags]Screencast, Ribbon, Office 2007[/tags]

The new Ribbon user interface makes it easy to do things like superscript text in Word 2007.  You no longer need to go searching through the Font dialog box to find the checkbox to do it.

On the ‘Home’ tab of the Ribbon, story in the ‘Font’ group, ampoule you will find an ‘x’ with a ‘2’ in superscript beside it.  Select the text you want to superscript, then click this button!  Easy as that!

If you still can’t find it, here is a picture of where you can find superscript in the Ribbon.

[tags]Superscript, Word 2007, Help[/tags]

A colleague of mine came running over to my desk the other day in quite a pickle!  He said “The New Paperclip… how on Earth do I name a range in Excel 2007?”

“Simple my friend” I replied.  Little did he know that I have no idea where it was, about it more about but I put my faith into the beauty that is the Ribbon to figure it out.

For the uninitiated, Naming a range is a great tool you can use in Excel.  It allows you to give a descriptive name to a range (like ‘Expenses’) instead of using the normal notation like (A10:A25).  Very handy if you work with quite a few formulas in a sheet.

So back to solving the problem.  Firstly, why would you name a range in Excel?  The answer is to make it easier to work with formulas.  So straight away I went looking for the Formulas tab in the Ribbon.  And there it was, a whole section on Named cells, which included the Name Manager (which enables you to control all the name references you have added to your workbook), Name a Range, and a few other Name functions.

Problem solved, in about 3 seconds flat.  The Ribbon is definitely going to make people more productive, just as long as they start thinking in a “Results Orientated” way.  Not too much of a shift if you ask me!

[tags]Excel 2007, Named Range[/tags]

There are a fewΒ screencasts starting to appear on the Microsoft Office 2007 Developer Center.

For those ofΒ you who don’t know what screencasts are, adiposity they are basically videos showing you exactly how to do something in an application.

This screencast details exactly how to extend the Office 2007 UI by building a custom ribbon!Β  Great if you want to customise the ribbon inΒ Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007, or Outlook 2007 with some menu options specific to your business, or your business systems.

[tags]Screencast, Ribbon, Office 2007[/tags]

The new Ribbon user interface makes it easy to do things like superscript text in Word 2007.  You no longer need to go searching through the Font dialog box to find the checkbox to do it.

On the ‘Home’ tab of the Ribbon, story in the ‘Font’ group, ampoule you will find an ‘x’ with a ‘2’ in superscript beside it.  Select the text you want to superscript, then click this button!  Easy as that!

If you still can’t find it, here is a picture of where you can find superscript in the Ribbon.

[tags]Superscript, Word 2007, Help[/tags]

Don’t worry!  Printing in Word 2007 is just as easy as in Word 2003… in fact it is even easier.

Where do I find the button to Print in Word 2007?

First – click on the Office Orb (the circle with the office logo in the top left hand corner of the screen… where you would have found file in Word 2003).

Second – move your mouse down to the ‘Print’ option.

Third – make your choice between ‘Print’, unhealthy ‘Quick Print’, and ‘Print Preview’

What is the difference between Print, Quick Print, and Print Preview?

Good question!  Print is just like how print used to be in Word 2003.  Clicking on Print will display the print dialog box, where you can select things like the printer, the number of copies, and what pages you want to print.  Once you have selected all your options, you can click OK, and Word will send the document to the printer.

Quick Print will print one copy of the document with the default printing settings – so if you have more than one printer set up on your computer, it will print to the one you have marked as default.

Print Preview will display how the document would look if you were to print it on paper.  Print preview is a great way to check if your document will look as professional as you want it to look!

[tags]Printing, Office 2007, Help[/tags]

A colleague of mine came running over to my desk the other day in quite a pickle!  He said “The New Paperclip… how on Earth do I name a range in Excel 2007?”

“Simple my friend” I replied.  Little did he know that I have no idea where it was, about it more about but I put my faith into the beauty that is the Ribbon to figure it out.

For the uninitiated, Naming a range is a great tool you can use in Excel.  It allows you to give a descriptive name to a range (like ‘Expenses’) instead of using the normal notation like (A10:A25).  Very handy if you work with quite a few formulas in a sheet.

So back to solving the problem.  Firstly, why would you name a range in Excel?  The answer is to make it easier to work with formulas.  So straight away I went looking for the Formulas tab in the Ribbon.  And there it was, a whole section on Named cells, which included the Name Manager (which enables you to control all the name references you have added to your workbook), Name a Range, and a few other Name functions.

Problem solved, in about 3 seconds flat.  The Ribbon is definitely going to make people more productive, just as long as they start thinking in a “Results Orientated” way.  Not too much of a shift if you ask me!

[tags]Excel 2007, Named Range[/tags]

There are a fewΒ screencasts starting to appear on the Microsoft Office 2007 Developer Center.

For those ofΒ you who don’t know what screencasts are, adiposity they are basically videos showing you exactly how to do something in an application.

This screencast details exactly how to extend the Office 2007 UI by building a custom ribbon!Β  Great if you want to customise the ribbon inΒ Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007, or Outlook 2007 with some menu options specific to your business, or your business systems.

[tags]Screencast, Ribbon, Office 2007[/tags]

The new Ribbon user interface makes it easy to do things like superscript text in Word 2007.  You no longer need to go searching through the Font dialog box to find the checkbox to do it.

On the ‘Home’ tab of the Ribbon, story in the ‘Font’ group, ampoule you will find an ‘x’ with a ‘2’ in superscript beside it.  Select the text you want to superscript, then click this button!  Easy as that!

If you still can’t find it, here is a picture of where you can find superscript in the Ribbon.

[tags]Superscript, Word 2007, Help[/tags]

Don’t worry!  Printing in Word 2007 is just as easy as in Word 2003… in fact it is even easier.

Where do I find the button to Print in Word 2007?

First – click on the Office Orb (the circle with the office logo in the top left hand corner of the screen… where you would have found file in Word 2003).

Second – move your mouse down to the ‘Print’ option.

Third – make your choice between ‘Print’, unhealthy ‘Quick Print’, and ‘Print Preview’

What is the difference between Print, Quick Print, and Print Preview?

Good question!  Print is just like how print used to be in Word 2003.  Clicking on Print will display the print dialog box, where you can select things like the printer, the number of copies, and what pages you want to print.  Once you have selected all your options, you can click OK, and Word will send the document to the printer.

Quick Print will print one copy of the document with the default printing settings – so if you have more than one printer set up on your computer, it will print to the one you have marked as default.

Print Preview will display how the document would look if you were to print it on paper.  Print preview is a great way to check if your document will look as professional as you want it to look!

[tags]Printing, Office 2007, Help[/tags]

Need to break up you document to make it more… presentable?  Breaks have been a part of Word for a long time, migraine but where are they and what do they do in Word 2007?

“Page Layout” -> “Page Setup” Group -> “Breaks”.  Still can’t find them, rehabilitation the screenshot below will help.

What is a Page Break?

A page break will force everything after the break onto a new page.  Word 2007 describes it as “marking the point at which one page ends and the next page begins.”

What is a Column Break?

A column break will force everything after the break into the next column. 

What is a Text Wrapping Break?

Specifically for webpages and blog entries, rehabilitation  a text wrapping break separates text around objects, such as caption text from body text.

What is a Next Page Section Break?

A next page section break firstly marks a section break in the document (which are very important when working with headers, footers, and other page formatting features), and also starts a new page, just like a page break.

What is a Continuous Page Section Break?

Same as the Next Page Section Break, except it does not begin a new page.

What is an Even Page Section Break?

An even page break is just like a next page section break, except that it will start a new section on the next even-numbered page.

What is an Odd Page Section Break?

Again, just like a next page section break, or an even page section break, except that it will start a new section on the next odd-numbered page

Why use an Odd or Even Page Section Break?

Good question!  Odd and even page breaks come in very handy when you are printing a booklet, and you want the next section to begin on the left hand page (even) or the right hand page (odd) when the booklet is open.  For example, if you are writing a book, and you want all your chapters to begin on the right hand page when someone is reading it, you can use an odd page section break to begin your new chapter.

[tags]Breaks, Help, Layout[/tags]

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP πŸ˜‰

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP πŸ˜‰

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP πŸ˜‰

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.Β  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping moreΒ Office 2007Β Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP πŸ˜‰

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP πŸ˜‰

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP πŸ˜‰

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.Β  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping moreΒ Office 2007Β Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP πŸ˜‰

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP πŸ˜‰

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.Β  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping moreΒ Office 2007Β Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP πŸ˜‰

I am sure as soon as you thought about upgrading to Office 2007 and looked at the options available, sale
you thought – “dang it, this is going to be hard work deciphering exactly what version (or SKU) of Office I should buy.” 

Well let me save you the hassle and let you know exactly what you are getting when you purchase Microsoft Office Professional 2007:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing / document reading and creation needs
  • Excel 2007
    For crunching the numbers
  • PowerPoint 2007
    For presenting information to your peers
  • Outlook 2007 (with Business Contact Manager)
    To keep in touch with your colleagues through email (and keep track of customer details using the Business Contact Manager)
  • Access 2007
    To build databases to store your important business data
  • Publisher 2007
    To produce professional looking documents, marketing collateral, reports, business cards, banners, signs, websites etc.
  • Accounting Express 2007
    To make managing the finances of your small business (or your EBay empire!) easy

There are two different versions of Microsoft Office Professional 2007 that you can buy.  The first is a full version of the product, which you need to buy if you do not currently have a version of Office on your computer. 

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Office 2007 has been Released to Manufacturing (RTM)

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

For many, tablets
students particularly, try
word count is a very important feature in Word.  I remember the good old days when back at Paperclip school.  When completing school assignments, Sildenafil
for some reason it not the quality of your writing that counted, but your ability to write as close as possible to 3000 words on a topic!

For those of you who feel the pain of word-limit assessment, or are simply interested in knowing how many words are in a document, Word 2007 makes it easier for you.

Firstly, you do not have to go looking for the word count feature.  In Word 2003 and previous versions, word count was hidden in the menu structure.  That is no more.

Word count now appears in the bottom left hand corner of the Word 2007 interface.  As you type, it will automatically update with the current word count.

But what if you want to know how many words are in a selection of text that you just made?  Simple.  Just select your text, and look back at the bottom left hand corner of the screen.  Word displays both the number of words in the selected text, and the total number of words in the document.

Finally if you want detailed statistics on the number of pages, words, paragraphs, characters (with and without spaces), and the number of lines in your document, simply click on the word count box which we have been talking about during this article.  A word count dialog box will appear with all the statistics you need.

Until next time!

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Microsoft Office 2007, Word Count, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

A number of people have asked me…

The New Paperclip… I made a big mistake, purchase
now how do I undo my changes in Word 2007?

Thanks for the questions… yes the Undo command has moved a little from previous versions of Word.  You can now find Undo (as well as Redo and Repeat) in the Quick Access Toolbar.  The Quick Access Toolbar lives in the top left hand corner of the screen.  Have a look at the image below, I have circled Undo so you know where it is for next time.

Note that you will also find Undo in the same spot (in the Quick Access Toolbar) in PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007 πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Undo, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

A number of people have asked me…

The New Paperclip… I made a big mistake, purchase
now how do I undo my changes in Word 2007?

Thanks for the questions… yes the Undo command has moved a little from previous versions of Word.  You can now find Undo (as well as Redo and Repeat) in the Quick Access Toolbar.  The Quick Access Toolbar lives in the top left hand corner of the screen.  Have a look at the image below, I have circled Undo so you know where it is for next time.

Note that you will also find Undo in the same spot (in the Quick Access Toolbar) in PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007 πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Undo, Tutorial[/tags]

Lets have a deep and meaningful look at how we make changes to the page layout in Microsoft Office Word 2007.

Where do you find all the Page Layout buttons?

Simply click on the “Page Layout” tab in the new Ribbon menu system.  By clicking on the Page Layout tab, hospital the Ribbon displays all the functionality you need to be able to change the key page layout and formatting aspects of your document!

What can I do with the Page Layout?

Good question!  By default (in Word 2007 Beta 2, apoplexy although it will be similar in the final retail release) there are five groups of features which you can use to change the look and feel of your document… They are:

  • Themes
  • Page Setup
  • Page Background
  • Paragraph
  • Arrange

Lets have a closer look at each one.

Themes

Themes enable you to very quickly and easily change the look and feel of the entire document to a specific theme style.  There are many different themes included in Word 2007 (and PowerPoint 2007 as well), ampoule and in fact by default when you create a new document, you are actually using a theme (the ‘Office’ theme).  If you are tired of the look of the themes that come with Word 2007, you can download more from Microsoft Office Online!

A theme specifies the fonts to be used, the colour palette, and the styling of graphics.  If you only want to use one aspect of the theme, you can!  Just select the palette, font or styling from one of the three galleries in the Themes group.

Page Setup

Page setup includes all the features you need to change your margins, the orientation of the paper (portrait or landscape), the size of the paper, the number of columns on the page, as well as breaks, line numbers and hyphenation!  To change all those features, simply click on the button associated with what you want to change, and select your preferred option from the gallery.

If you want more granular control over the page setup, click on the small icon in the bottom right hand corner of the page setup group, which looks like a small square with an arrow pointing out of it.

Page Background

In the Page Background group, you can add a watermark to your document, change the page color, or make your document look great with a page border.  A watermark is a grayed out image or text which appears in the background of your document.  For example, you could have the word ‘draft’ in the background of your document, so everyone reading knew that it was still a draft.

Again, simply select your watermark or colour from the gallery when you click on the button.

Paragraph

The paragraph group is where you can modify all the aspects of the paragraphs that appear in your document.  Indent essentially changes the margins for the paragraph.  You can set the left indent, or the right indent, and the distance is measured in inches.

Spacing is similar to indent, however you are changing the spacing before, or after a paragraph.  Spacing is measured in points (just like font size).

Again, for more granular control, click on the button in the bottom right hand corner of the group for more functionality.

Arrange

The arrange group allows you to control how objects interact with the text in your document.  For example, if you have a text box in your document, you can use the arrange group to:

  • Set the position of the text box
  • Bring it to the front (in front of other objects)
  • Send it to the back (behind other objects)
  • Set the text wrapping around the text box
  • Set the alignment of the text box
  • Group the text box with other text boxes
  • Rotate the text box.

Again, more granular control is available via the button in the bottom right hand corner of the arrange group.

Want to learn more?

So there you have it, a deep dive tutorial into the Page Layout tab in Microsoft Office Word 2007.  For more Word 2007 tutorials, tips and techniques, check out the Word 2007 category on www.thenewpaperclip.com 

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Layout[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

A number of people have asked me…

The New Paperclip… I made a big mistake, purchase
now how do I undo my changes in Word 2007?

Thanks for the questions… yes the Undo command has moved a little from previous versions of Word.  You can now find Undo (as well as Redo and Repeat) in the Quick Access Toolbar.  The Quick Access Toolbar lives in the top left hand corner of the screen.  Have a look at the image below, I have circled Undo so you know where it is for next time.

Note that you will also find Undo in the same spot (in the Quick Access Toolbar) in PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007 πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Undo, Tutorial[/tags]

Lets have a deep and meaningful look at how we make changes to the page layout in Microsoft Office Word 2007.

Where do you find all the Page Layout buttons?

Simply click on the “Page Layout” tab in the new Ribbon menu system.  By clicking on the Page Layout tab, hospital the Ribbon displays all the functionality you need to be able to change the key page layout and formatting aspects of your document!

What can I do with the Page Layout?

Good question!  By default (in Word 2007 Beta 2, apoplexy although it will be similar in the final retail release) there are five groups of features which you can use to change the look and feel of your document… They are:

  • Themes
  • Page Setup
  • Page Background
  • Paragraph
  • Arrange

Lets have a closer look at each one.

Themes

Themes enable you to very quickly and easily change the look and feel of the entire document to a specific theme style.  There are many different themes included in Word 2007 (and PowerPoint 2007 as well), ampoule and in fact by default when you create a new document, you are actually using a theme (the ‘Office’ theme).  If you are tired of the look of the themes that come with Word 2007, you can download more from Microsoft Office Online!

A theme specifies the fonts to be used, the colour palette, and the styling of graphics.  If you only want to use one aspect of the theme, you can!  Just select the palette, font or styling from one of the three galleries in the Themes group.

Page Setup

Page setup includes all the features you need to change your margins, the orientation of the paper (portrait or landscape), the size of the paper, the number of columns on the page, as well as breaks, line numbers and hyphenation!  To change all those features, simply click on the button associated with what you want to change, and select your preferred option from the gallery.

If you want more granular control over the page setup, click on the small icon in the bottom right hand corner of the page setup group, which looks like a small square with an arrow pointing out of it.

Page Background

In the Page Background group, you can add a watermark to your document, change the page color, or make your document look great with a page border.  A watermark is a grayed out image or text which appears in the background of your document.  For example, you could have the word ‘draft’ in the background of your document, so everyone reading knew that it was still a draft.

Again, simply select your watermark or colour from the gallery when you click on the button.

Paragraph

The paragraph group is where you can modify all the aspects of the paragraphs that appear in your document.  Indent essentially changes the margins for the paragraph.  You can set the left indent, or the right indent, and the distance is measured in inches.

Spacing is similar to indent, however you are changing the spacing before, or after a paragraph.  Spacing is measured in points (just like font size).

Again, for more granular control, click on the button in the bottom right hand corner of the group for more functionality.

Arrange

The arrange group allows you to control how objects interact with the text in your document.  For example, if you have a text box in your document, you can use the arrange group to:

  • Set the position of the text box
  • Bring it to the front (in front of other objects)
  • Send it to the back (behind other objects)
  • Set the text wrapping around the text box
  • Set the alignment of the text box
  • Group the text box with other text boxes
  • Rotate the text box.

Again, more granular control is available via the button in the bottom right hand corner of the arrange group.

Want to learn more?

So there you have it, a deep dive tutorial into the Page Layout tab in Microsoft Office Word 2007.  For more Word 2007 tutorials, tips and techniques, check out the Word 2007 category on www.thenewpaperclip.com 

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Layout[/tags]

Don’t like the ribbon?  Well there is a way to make Word 2007 look and feel just like the good old days back with Word 97!

If you want to throw away a decades worth of user interface innovation, website check out this post from Alistair Speirs, shop where he talks about how you can use the Quick Access Toolbar to take you back to the year which brought us “Titanic”, this “Men in Black”, “The Fifth Element”, and the often forgotten “Power Rangers Turbo: The Movie”

[tags]Word 2007, User Interface, Power Rangers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

A number of people have asked me…

The New Paperclip… I made a big mistake, purchase
now how do I undo my changes in Word 2007?

Thanks for the questions… yes the Undo command has moved a little from previous versions of Word.  You can now find Undo (as well as Redo and Repeat) in the Quick Access Toolbar.  The Quick Access Toolbar lives in the top left hand corner of the screen.  Have a look at the image below, I have circled Undo so you know where it is for next time.

Note that you will also find Undo in the same spot (in the Quick Access Toolbar) in PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007 πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Undo, Tutorial[/tags]

Lets have a deep and meaningful look at how we make changes to the page layout in Microsoft Office Word 2007.

Where do you find all the Page Layout buttons?

Simply click on the “Page Layout” tab in the new Ribbon menu system.  By clicking on the Page Layout tab, hospital the Ribbon displays all the functionality you need to be able to change the key page layout and formatting aspects of your document!

What can I do with the Page Layout?

Good question!  By default (in Word 2007 Beta 2, apoplexy although it will be similar in the final retail release) there are five groups of features which you can use to change the look and feel of your document… They are:

  • Themes
  • Page Setup
  • Page Background
  • Paragraph
  • Arrange

Lets have a closer look at each one.

Themes

Themes enable you to very quickly and easily change the look and feel of the entire document to a specific theme style.  There are many different themes included in Word 2007 (and PowerPoint 2007 as well), ampoule and in fact by default when you create a new document, you are actually using a theme (the ‘Office’ theme).  If you are tired of the look of the themes that come with Word 2007, you can download more from Microsoft Office Online!

A theme specifies the fonts to be used, the colour palette, and the styling of graphics.  If you only want to use one aspect of the theme, you can!  Just select the palette, font or styling from one of the three galleries in the Themes group.

Page Setup

Page setup includes all the features you need to change your margins, the orientation of the paper (portrait or landscape), the size of the paper, the number of columns on the page, as well as breaks, line numbers and hyphenation!  To change all those features, simply click on the button associated with what you want to change, and select your preferred option from the gallery.

If you want more granular control over the page setup, click on the small icon in the bottom right hand corner of the page setup group, which looks like a small square with an arrow pointing out of it.

Page Background

In the Page Background group, you can add a watermark to your document, change the page color, or make your document look great with a page border.  A watermark is a grayed out image or text which appears in the background of your document.  For example, you could have the word ‘draft’ in the background of your document, so everyone reading knew that it was still a draft.

Again, simply select your watermark or colour from the gallery when you click on the button.

Paragraph

The paragraph group is where you can modify all the aspects of the paragraphs that appear in your document.  Indent essentially changes the margins for the paragraph.  You can set the left indent, or the right indent, and the distance is measured in inches.

Spacing is similar to indent, however you are changing the spacing before, or after a paragraph.  Spacing is measured in points (just like font size).

Again, for more granular control, click on the button in the bottom right hand corner of the group for more functionality.

Arrange

The arrange group allows you to control how objects interact with the text in your document.  For example, if you have a text box in your document, you can use the arrange group to:

  • Set the position of the text box
  • Bring it to the front (in front of other objects)
  • Send it to the back (behind other objects)
  • Set the text wrapping around the text box
  • Set the alignment of the text box
  • Group the text box with other text boxes
  • Rotate the text box.

Again, more granular control is available via the button in the bottom right hand corner of the arrange group.

Want to learn more?

So there you have it, a deep dive tutorial into the Page Layout tab in Microsoft Office Word 2007.  For more Word 2007 tutorials, tips and techniques, check out the Word 2007 category on www.thenewpaperclip.com 

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Layout[/tags]

Don’t like the ribbon?  Well there is a way to make Word 2007 look and feel just like the good old days back with Word 97!

If you want to throw away a decades worth of user interface innovation, website check out this post from Alistair Speirs, shop where he talks about how you can use the Quick Access Toolbar to take you back to the year which brought us “Titanic”, this “Men in Black”, “The Fifth Element”, and the often forgotten “Power Rangers Turbo: The Movie”

[tags]Word 2007, User Interface, Power Rangers[/tags]

Glad you asked!  Groove is one of those tools (like OneNote), decease that at first you think… why would I use that, but once you start, you realise that your life would suck without it!

What is Groove 2007?

Groove in the broadest sense is a piece of software which allows you to collaborate with people.  But not just people in your workplace, but your business partners, customers, or anyone you want!  The best part is that you do not need the IT department to create a site for you, or open up ports in the firewall, or actually be online to use it!  That’s right, you can be offline (away from the network) and still access a local copy of your collaborative workspace.  Once you log back on, Groove will sync the workspace with all of your colleagues.

But why would I want to use it?

Ever dealt with customers via email (if you answered yes, then go purchase Groove 2007 licenses now, and read the rest of this whilst you wait for them to arrive!).  Do documents get lost in the email, or do you find it hard to keep track of what you have shared with each customer?  Why not build a secure workspace, invite your customer to participate, and then collaborate!  You both have a secure place to share documents, chat about ideas, and send and receive messages.  I like to call it unstructured structured collaboration (if you get my drift).

Personally I use Groove all the time… so I will focus my next few posts on how you can take advantage of this great product to bring your friends close, and your customers closer!

[tags]Groove 2007, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

A number of people have asked me…

The New Paperclip… I made a big mistake, purchase
now how do I undo my changes in Word 2007?

Thanks for the questions… yes the Undo command has moved a little from previous versions of Word.  You can now find Undo (as well as Redo and Repeat) in the Quick Access Toolbar.  The Quick Access Toolbar lives in the top left hand corner of the screen.  Have a look at the image below, I have circled Undo so you know where it is for next time.

Note that you will also find Undo in the same spot (in the Quick Access Toolbar) in PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007 πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Undo, Tutorial[/tags]

Lets have a deep and meaningful look at how we make changes to the page layout in Microsoft Office Word 2007.

Where do you find all the Page Layout buttons?

Simply click on the “Page Layout” tab in the new Ribbon menu system.  By clicking on the Page Layout tab, hospital the Ribbon displays all the functionality you need to be able to change the key page layout and formatting aspects of your document!

What can I do with the Page Layout?

Good question!  By default (in Word 2007 Beta 2, apoplexy although it will be similar in the final retail release) there are five groups of features which you can use to change the look and feel of your document… They are:

  • Themes
  • Page Setup
  • Page Background
  • Paragraph
  • Arrange

Lets have a closer look at each one.

Themes

Themes enable you to very quickly and easily change the look and feel of the entire document to a specific theme style.  There are many different themes included in Word 2007 (and PowerPoint 2007 as well), ampoule and in fact by default when you create a new document, you are actually using a theme (the ‘Office’ theme).  If you are tired of the look of the themes that come with Word 2007, you can download more from Microsoft Office Online!

A theme specifies the fonts to be used, the colour palette, and the styling of graphics.  If you only want to use one aspect of the theme, you can!  Just select the palette, font or styling from one of the three galleries in the Themes group.

Page Setup

Page setup includes all the features you need to change your margins, the orientation of the paper (portrait or landscape), the size of the paper, the number of columns on the page, as well as breaks, line numbers and hyphenation!  To change all those features, simply click on the button associated with what you want to change, and select your preferred option from the gallery.

If you want more granular control over the page setup, click on the small icon in the bottom right hand corner of the page setup group, which looks like a small square with an arrow pointing out of it.

Page Background

In the Page Background group, you can add a watermark to your document, change the page color, or make your document look great with a page border.  A watermark is a grayed out image or text which appears in the background of your document.  For example, you could have the word ‘draft’ in the background of your document, so everyone reading knew that it was still a draft.

Again, simply select your watermark or colour from the gallery when you click on the button.

Paragraph

The paragraph group is where you can modify all the aspects of the paragraphs that appear in your document.  Indent essentially changes the margins for the paragraph.  You can set the left indent, or the right indent, and the distance is measured in inches.

Spacing is similar to indent, however you are changing the spacing before, or after a paragraph.  Spacing is measured in points (just like font size).

Again, for more granular control, click on the button in the bottom right hand corner of the group for more functionality.

Arrange

The arrange group allows you to control how objects interact with the text in your document.  For example, if you have a text box in your document, you can use the arrange group to:

  • Set the position of the text box
  • Bring it to the front (in front of other objects)
  • Send it to the back (behind other objects)
  • Set the text wrapping around the text box
  • Set the alignment of the text box
  • Group the text box with other text boxes
  • Rotate the text box.

Again, more granular control is available via the button in the bottom right hand corner of the arrange group.

Want to learn more?

So there you have it, a deep dive tutorial into the Page Layout tab in Microsoft Office Word 2007.  For more Word 2007 tutorials, tips and techniques, check out the Word 2007 category on www.thenewpaperclip.com 

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Layout[/tags]

Don’t like the ribbon?  Well there is a way to make Word 2007 look and feel just like the good old days back with Word 97!

If you want to throw away a decades worth of user interface innovation, website check out this post from Alistair Speirs, shop where he talks about how you can use the Quick Access Toolbar to take you back to the year which brought us “Titanic”, this “Men in Black”, “The Fifth Element”, and the often forgotten “Power Rangers Turbo: The Movie”

[tags]Word 2007, User Interface, Power Rangers[/tags]

Glad you asked!  Groove is one of those tools (like OneNote), decease that at first you think… why would I use that, but once you start, you realise that your life would suck without it!

What is Groove 2007?

Groove in the broadest sense is a piece of software which allows you to collaborate with people.  But not just people in your workplace, but your business partners, customers, or anyone you want!  The best part is that you do not need the IT department to create a site for you, or open up ports in the firewall, or actually be online to use it!  That’s right, you can be offline (away from the network) and still access a local copy of your collaborative workspace.  Once you log back on, Groove will sync the workspace with all of your colleagues.

But why would I want to use it?

Ever dealt with customers via email (if you answered yes, then go purchase Groove 2007 licenses now, and read the rest of this whilst you wait for them to arrive!).  Do documents get lost in the email, or do you find it hard to keep track of what you have shared with each customer?  Why not build a secure workspace, invite your customer to participate, and then collaborate!  You both have a secure place to share documents, chat about ideas, and send and receive messages.  I like to call it unstructured structured collaboration (if you get my drift).

Personally I use Groove all the time… so I will focus my next few posts on how you can take advantage of this great product to bring your friends close, and your customers closer!

[tags]Groove 2007, Tutorial[/tags]

Glad you asked!  Groove is one of those tools (like OneNote), decease that at first you think… why would I use that, but once you start, you realise that your life would suck without it!

What is Groove 2007?

Groove in the broadest sense is a piece of software which allows you to collaborate with people.  But not just people in your workplace, but your business partners, customers, or anyone you want!  The best part is that you do not need the IT department to create a site for you, or open up ports in the firewall, or actually be online to use it!  That’s right, you can be offline (away from the network) and still access a local copy of your collaborative workspace.  Once you log back on, Groove will sync the workspace with all of your colleagues.

But why would I want to use it?

Ever dealt with customers via email (if you answered yes, then go purchase Groove 2007 licenses now, and read the rest of this whilst you wait for them to arrive!).  Do documents get lost in the email, or do you find it hard to keep track of what you have shared with each customer?  Why not build a secure workspace, invite your customer to participate, and then collaborate!  You both have a secure place to share documents, chat about ideas, and send and receive messages.  I like to call it unstructured structured collaboration (if you get my drift).

Personally I use Groove all the time… so I will focus my next few posts on how you can take advantage of this great product to bring your friends close, and your customers closer!

[tags]Groove 2007, Tutorial[/tags]

The first thing you will want to do (after setting up your Groove account) is to create a workspace, website like this
so you can start collaborating.

There are a few options to choose from when creating your workspace, denture
depending on what you plan to collaborate about.

The Standard Groove 2007 Workspace

The Standard Groove 2007 Workspace includes a Files tool and a Discussion tool.  You can add more options later, viagra buy
but this is basically your bare bones collaboration space.

To create a standard workspace, click on “Create new Workspace” from the Groove Launchbar, type in the name of your workspace, ensure the “Standard” radio button is selected, and then click ok.

The File Sharing Groove 2007 Workspace

Using the File Sharing workspace, you can synchronize a windows folder across different computers.  The best part is that you can access the synchronized folder from any Windows Application.

To create a file sharing workspace, click on “Create new Workspace” from the Groove Launchbar, type in the name of your workspace, ensure the “File Sharing” radio button is selected, then click ok.

Groove 2007 Workspace Templates

If you have a specialized project or task you want to collaborate on, there are many different templates available for free which you can use.  To browse the available templates, click on “Create new Workspace” from the Groove Launchbar, and then select “Browse Templates”

This will take you to a webpage which lists a number of different templates grouped by the type of business you are in (Enterprise, Government or Small Business), or the specific function you are after.  The one I am most excited about is the “Annual Marketing Programs” template, which allows you go keep track of all the marketing programs you have on the go across a distributed marketing team!!!

The other option here is to create your own custom workspace, which could include any of the following tools:

  • Calendar – for marking dates
  • Chess Game – for building team morale
  • Discussion – for conversations
  • Files – for storing stuff
  • Forms – for collecting and viewing data
  • InfoPath Forms – for collecting and viewing data
  • Issue Tracking – for the status of issues and incidents
  • Meetings – for the management of agendas, action items etc.
  • Notepad – for editing text
  • Pictures – for sharing graphics, photos etc
  • SharePoint Files – for synchronizing with a SharePoint library
  • Sketchpad – for drawing stuff

Which option should I choose?

If you are just starting out, I would create a standard workspace.  This way you get used to the basic functionality of Groove 2007, and understand how it works without the complexity of added features.  Once you have the basics nailed, go straight for the workspace templates and start collaborating!

[tags]Groove 2007, Workspace, Collaboration[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

Do you find that the Ribbon is gets in the way every now and then, treat
and steals valuable screen realestate?  Here is a simple solution.

To minimise the Ribbon, visit this site
simply double click on the tabs above the ribbon.  This will minimize the ribbon to just the tabs.  Instead of double clicking, you can use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.

To restore the Ribbon to its glory, simply double click on the tabs again, or use CTRL+F1

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Ribbon[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

Does the Word 2007 Splash Screen distract you too much when you are waiting for Word to load?  There is a solution.

  1. Create a shortcut on your desktop (right click on the desktop, pilule go to new, and select shortcut).
  2. Type the full path of Word 2007 on your computer (the default is probably “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe”
  3. After the full path, add a space, and then /q (so it looks like “c:program filesmicrosoft officeoffice 12winword.exe /q”
  4. Click finish.

Now, double click on the shortcut to load Word 2007, minus the splash screen

’till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Splash Screen[/tags]

A number of people have asked me…

The New Paperclip… I made a big mistake, purchase
now how do I undo my changes in Word 2007?

Thanks for the questions… yes the Undo command has moved a little from previous versions of Word.  You can now find Undo (as well as Redo and Repeat) in the Quick Access Toolbar.  The Quick Access Toolbar lives in the top left hand corner of the screen.  Have a look at the image below, I have circled Undo so you know where it is for next time.

Note that you will also find Undo in the same spot (in the Quick Access Toolbar) in PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007 πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Undo, Tutorial[/tags]

Lets have a deep and meaningful look at how we make changes to the page layout in Microsoft Office Word 2007.

Where do you find all the Page Layout buttons?

Simply click on the “Page Layout” tab in the new Ribbon menu system.  By clicking on the Page Layout tab, hospital the Ribbon displays all the functionality you need to be able to change the key page layout and formatting aspects of your document!

What can I do with the Page Layout?

Good question!  By default (in Word 2007 Beta 2, apoplexy although it will be similar in the final retail release) there are five groups of features which you can use to change the look and feel of your document… They are:

  • Themes
  • Page Setup
  • Page Background
  • Paragraph
  • Arrange

Lets have a closer look at each one.

Themes

Themes enable you to very quickly and easily change the look and feel of the entire document to a specific theme style.  There are many different themes included in Word 2007 (and PowerPoint 2007 as well), ampoule and in fact by default when you create a new document, you are actually using a theme (the ‘Office’ theme).  If you are tired of the look of the themes that come with Word 2007, you can download more from Microsoft Office Online!

A theme specifies the fonts to be used, the colour palette, and the styling of graphics.  If you only want to use one aspect of the theme, you can!  Just select the palette, font or styling from one of the three galleries in the Themes group.

Page Setup

Page setup includes all the features you need to change your margins, the orientation of the paper (portrait or landscape), the size of the paper, the number of columns on the page, as well as breaks, line numbers and hyphenation!  To change all those features, simply click on the button associated with what you want to change, and select your preferred option from the gallery.

If you want more granular control over the page setup, click on the small icon in the bottom right hand corner of the page setup group, which looks like a small square with an arrow pointing out of it.

Page Background

In the Page Background group, you can add a watermark to your document, change the page color, or make your document look great with a page border.  A watermark is a grayed out image or text which appears in the background of your document.  For example, you could have the word ‘draft’ in the background of your document, so everyone reading knew that it was still a draft.

Again, simply select your watermark or colour from the gallery when you click on the button.

Paragraph

The paragraph group is where you can modify all the aspects of the paragraphs that appear in your document.  Indent essentially changes the margins for the paragraph.  You can set the left indent, or the right indent, and the distance is measured in inches.

Spacing is similar to indent, however you are changing the spacing before, or after a paragraph.  Spacing is measured in points (just like font size).

Again, for more granular control, click on the button in the bottom right hand corner of the group for more functionality.

Arrange

The arrange group allows you to control how objects interact with the text in your document.  For example, if you have a text box in your document, you can use the arrange group to:

  • Set the position of the text box
  • Bring it to the front (in front of other objects)
  • Send it to the back (behind other objects)
  • Set the text wrapping around the text box
  • Set the alignment of the text box
  • Group the text box with other text boxes
  • Rotate the text box.

Again, more granular control is available via the button in the bottom right hand corner of the arrange group.

Want to learn more?

So there you have it, a deep dive tutorial into the Page Layout tab in Microsoft Office Word 2007.  For more Word 2007 tutorials, tips and techniques, check out the Word 2007 category on www.thenewpaperclip.com 

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Layout[/tags]

Don’t like the ribbon?  Well there is a way to make Word 2007 look and feel just like the good old days back with Word 97!

If you want to throw away a decades worth of user interface innovation, website check out this post from Alistair Speirs, shop where he talks about how you can use the Quick Access Toolbar to take you back to the year which brought us “Titanic”, this “Men in Black”, “The Fifth Element”, and the often forgotten “Power Rangers Turbo: The Movie”

[tags]Word 2007, User Interface, Power Rangers[/tags]

Glad you asked!  Groove is one of those tools (like OneNote), decease that at first you think… why would I use that, but once you start, you realise that your life would suck without it!

What is Groove 2007?

Groove in the broadest sense is a piece of software which allows you to collaborate with people.  But not just people in your workplace, but your business partners, customers, or anyone you want!  The best part is that you do not need the IT department to create a site for you, or open up ports in the firewall, or actually be online to use it!  That’s right, you can be offline (away from the network) and still access a local copy of your collaborative workspace.  Once you log back on, Groove will sync the workspace with all of your colleagues.

But why would I want to use it?

Ever dealt with customers via email (if you answered yes, then go purchase Groove 2007 licenses now, and read the rest of this whilst you wait for them to arrive!).  Do documents get lost in the email, or do you find it hard to keep track of what you have shared with each customer?  Why not build a secure workspace, invite your customer to participate, and then collaborate!  You both have a secure place to share documents, chat about ideas, and send and receive messages.  I like to call it unstructured structured collaboration (if you get my drift).

Personally I use Groove all the time… so I will focus my next few posts on how you can take advantage of this great product to bring your friends close, and your customers closer!

[tags]Groove 2007, Tutorial[/tags]

Glad you asked!  Groove is one of those tools (like OneNote), decease that at first you think… why would I use that, but once you start, you realise that your life would suck without it!

What is Groove 2007?

Groove in the broadest sense is a piece of software which allows you to collaborate with people.  But not just people in your workplace, but your business partners, customers, or anyone you want!  The best part is that you do not need the IT department to create a site for you, or open up ports in the firewall, or actually be online to use it!  That’s right, you can be offline (away from the network) and still access a local copy of your collaborative workspace.  Once you log back on, Groove will sync the workspace with all of your colleagues.

But why would I want to use it?

Ever dealt with customers via email (if you answered yes, then go purchase Groove 2007 licenses now, and read the rest of this whilst you wait for them to arrive!).  Do documents get lost in the email, or do you find it hard to keep track of what you have shared with each customer?  Why not build a secure workspace, invite your customer to participate, and then collaborate!  You both have a secure place to share documents, chat about ideas, and send and receive messages.  I like to call it unstructured structured collaboration (if you get my drift).

Personally I use Groove all the time… so I will focus my next few posts on how you can take advantage of this great product to bring your friends close, and your customers closer!

[tags]Groove 2007, Tutorial[/tags]

The first thing you will want to do (after setting up your Groove account) is to create a workspace, website like this
so you can start collaborating.

There are a few options to choose from when creating your workspace, denture
depending on what you plan to collaborate about.

The Standard Groove 2007 Workspace

The Standard Groove 2007 Workspace includes a Files tool and a Discussion tool.  You can add more options later, viagra buy
but this is basically your bare bones collaboration space.

To create a standard workspace, click on “Create new Workspace” from the Groove Launchbar, type in the name of your workspace, ensure the “Standard” radio button is selected, and then click ok.

The File Sharing Groove 2007 Workspace

Using the File Sharing workspace, you can synchronize a windows folder across different computers.  The best part is that you can access the synchronized folder from any Windows Application.

To create a file sharing workspace, click on “Create new Workspace” from the Groove Launchbar, type in the name of your workspace, ensure the “File Sharing” radio button is selected, then click ok.

Groove 2007 Workspace Templates

If you have a specialized project or task you want to collaborate on, there are many different templates available for free which you can use.  To browse the available templates, click on “Create new Workspace” from the Groove Launchbar, and then select “Browse Templates”

This will take you to a webpage which lists a number of different templates grouped by the type of business you are in (Enterprise, Government or Small Business), or the specific function you are after.  The one I am most excited about is the “Annual Marketing Programs” template, which allows you go keep track of all the marketing programs you have on the go across a distributed marketing team!!!

The other option here is to create your own custom workspace, which could include any of the following tools:

  • Calendar – for marking dates
  • Chess Game – for building team morale
  • Discussion – for conversations
  • Files – for storing stuff
  • Forms – for collecting and viewing data
  • InfoPath Forms – for collecting and viewing data
  • Issue Tracking – for the status of issues and incidents
  • Meetings – for the management of agendas, action items etc.
  • Notepad – for editing text
  • Pictures – for sharing graphics, photos etc
  • SharePoint Files – for synchronizing with a SharePoint library
  • Sketchpad – for drawing stuff

Which option should I choose?

If you are just starting out, I would create a standard workspace.  This way you get used to the basic functionality of Groove 2007, and understand how it works without the complexity of added features.  Once you have the basics nailed, go straight for the workspace templates and start collaborating!

[tags]Groove 2007, Workspace, Collaboration[/tags]

Groove 2007 is a fantastic tool to use to get closer to your customers, abortion suppliers or colleagues.  I know that as more people understand exactly what you can achieve with Groove, buy viagra it will take off like a wild fire.

One example of functionality which has definite business value is the ability to manage meetings.  Let me take you through a quick tutorial on how to use the meeting tool in Microsoft Office Groove 2007

1) Add the meeting tool to your workspace

In the common tasks section on the right hand side of your screen, side effects there is an option to ‘Add Tools’.  Click on this, and then select the ‘Meetings’ tool from the list of tools presented.  Click ‘OK’

What you are presented with is a new tab in your Groove Workspace, called ‘Meetings’.  You can see what it looks like in the screen shot below.

From this view you can manage all the meetings you have with your collaboration partner (whether they be a customer, supplier, strategic partner or colleague)

2) Create a new meeting

To create a new meeting in Groove 2007, click on ‘New Meeting’ in the top left hand corner of the meeting tool.  Once you click new meeting, the ‘Meeting Wizard’ dialogue appears.

Simply fill in the specific details of the meeting, including the subject, start and finish times, the location, and the details of the meeting.  You can also attach files to the meeting by clicking on the paperclip in the bottom left hand corner of the wizard.  Click ok when you are finished.  Once you have created your meeting, you can then go back to the meeting tool and mange your meetings from there. 

3) Manage the meeting

From the meetings tool you can select your attendees for your meeting.  Attendees are only restricted to members of the workspace.  From the attendees tab, you can select who should attend the meeting, whether or not they are the chairperson or the minutes taker, and any notes you want to pass on to them.

From the meetings tool you can also manage the meeting agenda.  Select the agenda tab, then click ‘New Topic’.  From this dialog box you can add the subject for your agenda topic, the presenter, the duration and the details of the topic.  Again like the meeting itself, you can add files or other attachments using the paperclip in the bottom left hand corner of the box.

During your meeting, you can take minutes for each of your agenda items by clicking on the minutes tab.  Simply type the notes for each agenda item as you go.

Finally to manage the action items which come out of the meeting, click the actions tab, and add new action items as appropriate.

Conclusion

The best thing about the meetings tool in Groove 2007 is that everyone has the same record of the meeting and its outcomes, straight after the meeting (no need to wait for the secretary to send out the minutes after she/he types them up).  If you invite someone new into the workspace, they can see the history of all previous meetings as well.

One great example of removing the human latency out of collaboration!  Now that is business value!!!

[tags]Groove 2007, Business Value, Meetings, Collaboration[/tags]

A colleague of mine came running over to my desk the other day in quite a pickle!  He said “The New Paperclip… how on Earth do I name a range in Excel 2007?”

“Simple my friend” I replied.  Little did he know that I have no idea where it was, about it more about but I put my faith into the beauty that is the Ribbon to figure it out.

For the uninitiated, Naming a range is a great tool you can use in Excel.  It allows you to give a descriptive name to a range (like ‘Expenses’) instead of using the normal notation like (A10:A25).  Very handy if you work with quite a few formulas in a sheet.

So back to solving the problem.  Firstly, why would you name a range in Excel?  The answer is to make it easier to work with formulas.  So straight away I went looking for the Formulas tab in the Ribbon.  And there it was, a whole section on Named cells, which included the Name Manager (which enables you to control all the name references you have added to your workbook), Name a Range, and a few other Name functions.

Problem solved, in about 3 seconds flat.  The Ribbon is definitely going to make people more productive, just as long as they start thinking in a “Results Orientated” way.  Not too much of a shift if you ask me!

[tags]Excel 2007, Named Range[/tags]

A colleague of mine came running over to my desk the other day in quite a pickle!  He said “The New Paperclip… how on Earth do I name a range in Excel 2007?”

“Simple my friend” I replied.  Little did he know that I have no idea where it was, about it more about but I put my faith into the beauty that is the Ribbon to figure it out.

For the uninitiated, Naming a range is a great tool you can use in Excel.  It allows you to give a descriptive name to a range (like ‘Expenses’) instead of using the normal notation like (A10:A25).  Very handy if you work with quite a few formulas in a sheet.

So back to solving the problem.  Firstly, why would you name a range in Excel?  The answer is to make it easier to work with formulas.  So straight away I went looking for the Formulas tab in the Ribbon.  And there it was, a whole section on Named cells, which included the Name Manager (which enables you to control all the name references you have added to your workbook), Name a Range, and a few other Name functions.

Problem solved, in about 3 seconds flat.  The Ribbon is definitely going to make people more productive, just as long as they start thinking in a “Results Orientated” way.  Not too much of a shift if you ask me!

[tags]Excel 2007, Named Range[/tags]

There are a fewΒ screencasts starting to appear on the Microsoft Office 2007 Developer Center.

For those ofΒ you who don’t know what screencasts are, adiposity they are basically videos showing you exactly how to do something in an application.

This screencast details exactly how to extend the Office 2007 UI by building a custom ribbon!Β  Great if you want to customise the ribbon inΒ Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007, or Outlook 2007 with some menu options specific to your business, or your business systems.

[tags]Screencast, Ribbon, Office 2007[/tags]

A colleague of mine came running over to my desk the other day in quite a pickle!  He said “The New Paperclip… how on Earth do I name a range in Excel 2007?”

“Simple my friend” I replied.  Little did he know that I have no idea where it was, about it more about but I put my faith into the beauty that is the Ribbon to figure it out.

For the uninitiated, Naming a range is a great tool you can use in Excel.  It allows you to give a descriptive name to a range (like ‘Expenses’) instead of using the normal notation like (A10:A25).  Very handy if you work with quite a few formulas in a sheet.

So back to solving the problem.  Firstly, why would you name a range in Excel?  The answer is to make it easier to work with formulas.  So straight away I went looking for the Formulas tab in the Ribbon.  And there it was, a whole section on Named cells, which included the Name Manager (which enables you to control all the name references you have added to your workbook), Name a Range, and a few other Name functions.

Problem solved, in about 3 seconds flat.  The Ribbon is definitely going to make people more productive, just as long as they start thinking in a “Results Orientated” way.  Not too much of a shift if you ask me!

[tags]Excel 2007, Named Range[/tags]

There are a fewΒ screencasts starting to appear on the Microsoft Office 2007 Developer Center.

For those ofΒ you who don’t know what screencasts are, adiposity they are basically videos showing you exactly how to do something in an application.

This screencast details exactly how to extend the Office 2007 UI by building a custom ribbon!Β  Great if you want to customise the ribbon inΒ Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007, or Outlook 2007 with some menu options specific to your business, or your business systems.

[tags]Screencast, Ribbon, Office 2007[/tags]

The new Ribbon user interface makes it easy to do things like superscript text in Word 2007.  You no longer need to go searching through the Font dialog box to find the checkbox to do it.

On the ‘Home’ tab of the Ribbon, story in the ‘Font’ group, ampoule you will find an ‘x’ with a ‘2’ in superscript beside it.  Select the text you want to superscript, then click this button!  Easy as that!

If you still can’t find it, here is a picture of where you can find superscript in the Ribbon.

[tags]Superscript, Word 2007, Help[/tags]

A colleague of mine came running over to my desk the other day in quite a pickle!  He said “The New Paperclip… how on Earth do I name a range in Excel 2007?”

“Simple my friend” I replied.  Little did he know that I have no idea where it was, about it more about but I put my faith into the beauty that is the Ribbon to figure it out.

For the uninitiated, Naming a range is a great tool you can use in Excel.  It allows you to give a descriptive name to a range (like ‘Expenses’) instead of using the normal notation like (A10:A25).  Very handy if you work with quite a few formulas in a sheet.

So back to solving the problem.  Firstly, why would you name a range in Excel?  The answer is to make it easier to work with formulas.  So straight away I went looking for the Formulas tab in the Ribbon.  And there it was, a whole section on Named cells, which included the Name Manager (which enables you to control all the name references you have added to your workbook), Name a Range, and a few other Name functions.

Problem solved, in about 3 seconds flat.  The Ribbon is definitely going to make people more productive, just as long as they start thinking in a “Results Orientated” way.  Not too much of a shift if you ask me!

[tags]Excel 2007, Named Range[/tags]

There are a fewΒ screencasts starting to appear on the Microsoft Office 2007 Developer Center.

For those ofΒ you who don’t know what screencasts are, adiposity they are basically videos showing you exactly how to do something in an application.

This screencast details exactly how to extend the Office 2007 UI by building a custom ribbon!Β  Great if you want to customise the ribbon inΒ Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007, or Outlook 2007 with some menu options specific to your business, or your business systems.

[tags]Screencast, Ribbon, Office 2007[/tags]

The new Ribbon user interface makes it easy to do things like superscript text in Word 2007.  You no longer need to go searching through the Font dialog box to find the checkbox to do it.

On the ‘Home’ tab of the Ribbon, story in the ‘Font’ group, ampoule you will find an ‘x’ with a ‘2’ in superscript beside it.  Select the text you want to superscript, then click this button!  Easy as that!

If you still can’t find it, here is a picture of where you can find superscript in the Ribbon.

[tags]Superscript, Word 2007, Help[/tags]

Don’t worry!  Printing in Word 2007 is just as easy as in Word 2003… in fact it is even easier.

Where do I find the button to Print in Word 2007?

First – click on the Office Orb (the circle with the office logo in the top left hand corner of the screen… where you would have found file in Word 2003).

Second – move your mouse down to the ‘Print’ option.

Third – make your choice between ‘Print’, unhealthy ‘Quick Print’, and ‘Print Preview’

What is the difference between Print, Quick Print, and Print Preview?

Good question!  Print is just like how print used to be in Word 2003.  Clicking on Print will display the print dialog box, where you can select things like the printer, the number of copies, and what pages you want to print.  Once you have selected all your options, you can click OK, and Word will send the document to the printer.

Quick Print will print one copy of the document with the default printing settings – so if you have more than one printer set up on your computer, it will print to the one you have marked as default.

Print Preview will display how the document would look if you were to print it on paper.  Print preview is a great way to check if your document will look as professional as you want it to look!

[tags]Printing, Office 2007, Help[/tags]

A colleague of mine came running over to my desk the other day in quite a pickle!  He said “The New Paperclip… how on Earth do I name a range in Excel 2007?”

“Simple my friend” I replied.  Little did he know that I have no idea where it was, about it more about but I put my faith into the beauty that is the Ribbon to figure it out.

For the uninitiated, Naming a range is a great tool you can use in Excel.  It allows you to give a descriptive name to a range (like ‘Expenses’) instead of using the normal notation like (A10:A25).  Very handy if you work with quite a few formulas in a sheet.

So back to solving the problem.  Firstly, why would you name a range in Excel?  The answer is to make it easier to work with formulas.  So straight away I went looking for the Formulas tab in the Ribbon.  And there it was, a whole section on Named cells, which included the Name Manager (which enables you to control all the name references you have added to your workbook), Name a Range, and a few other Name functions.

Problem solved, in about 3 seconds flat.  The Ribbon is definitely going to make people more productive, just as long as they start thinking in a “Results Orientated” way.  Not too much of a shift if you ask me!

[tags]Excel 2007, Named Range[/tags]

There are a fewΒ screencasts starting to appear on the Microsoft Office 2007 Developer Center.

For those ofΒ you who don’t know what screencasts are, adiposity they are basically videos showing you exactly how to do something in an application.

This screencast details exactly how to extend the Office 2007 UI by building a custom ribbon!Β  Great if you want to customise the ribbon inΒ Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007, or Outlook 2007 with some menu options specific to your business, or your business systems.

[tags]Screencast, Ribbon, Office 2007[/tags]

The new Ribbon user interface makes it easy to do things like superscript text in Word 2007.  You no longer need to go searching through the Font dialog box to find the checkbox to do it.

On the ‘Home’ tab of the Ribbon, story in the ‘Font’ group, ampoule you will find an ‘x’ with a ‘2’ in superscript beside it.  Select the text you want to superscript, then click this button!  Easy as that!

If you still can’t find it, here is a picture of where you can find superscript in the Ribbon.

[tags]Superscript, Word 2007, Help[/tags]

Don’t worry!  Printing in Word 2007 is just as easy as in Word 2003… in fact it is even easier.

Where do I find the button to Print in Word 2007?

First – click on the Office Orb (the circle with the office logo in the top left hand corner of the screen… where you would have found file in Word 2003).

Second – move your mouse down to the ‘Print’ option.

Third – make your choice between ‘Print’, unhealthy ‘Quick Print’, and ‘Print Preview’

What is the difference between Print, Quick Print, and Print Preview?

Good question!  Print is just like how print used to be in Word 2003.  Clicking on Print will display the print dialog box, where you can select things like the printer, the number of copies, and what pages you want to print.  Once you have selected all your options, you can click OK, and Word will send the document to the printer.

Quick Print will print one copy of the document with the default printing settings – so if you have more than one printer set up on your computer, it will print to the one you have marked as default.

Print Preview will display how the document would look if you were to print it on paper.  Print preview is a great way to check if your document will look as professional as you want it to look!

[tags]Printing, Office 2007, Help[/tags]

Need to break up you document to make it more… presentable?  Breaks have been a part of Word for a long time, migraine but where are they and what do they do in Word 2007?

“Page Layout” -> “Page Setup” Group -> “Breaks”.  Still can’t find them, rehabilitation the screenshot below will help.

What is a Page Break?

A page break will force everything after the break onto a new page.  Word 2007 describes it as “marking the point at which one page ends and the next page begins.”

What is a Column Break?

A column break will force everything after the break into the next column. 

What is a Text Wrapping Break?

Specifically for webpages and blog entries, rehabilitation  a text wrapping break separates text around objects, such as caption text from body text.

What is a Next Page Section Break?

A next page section break firstly marks a section break in the document (which are very important when working with headers, footers, and other page formatting features), and also starts a new page, just like a page break.

What is a Continuous Page Section Break?

Same as the Next Page Section Break, except it does not begin a new page.

What is an Even Page Section Break?

An even page break is just like a next page section break, except that it will start a new section on the next even-numbered page.

What is an Odd Page Section Break?

Again, just like a next page section break, or an even page section break, except that it will start a new section on the next odd-numbered page

Why use an Odd or Even Page Section Break?

Good question!  Odd and even page breaks come in very handy when you are printing a booklet, and you want the next section to begin on the left hand page (even) or the right hand page (odd) when the booklet is open.  For example, if you are writing a book, and you want all your chapters to begin on the right hand page when someone is reading it, you can use an odd page section break to begin your new chapter.

[tags]Breaks, Help, Layout[/tags]

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP πŸ˜‰

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Screencast – Extending the Office 2007 UI with a Custom Ribbon

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

So you have started your favourite Office 2007 program for the first time.  And now you are lost.  What happened to the file menu?  Where is the help menu?  What on earth is that circle in the top left corner?  Lets quickly run through a Microsoft Office 2007 user interface tutorial so you can get up to speed and productive in no time!

What happened to the file menu?

The old style menu system from Office 2003, mycoplasmosis Office XP, viagra and earlier versions has been replaced with a brand new interface, which most people call the ‘Ribbon’.  Why did Microsoft replace the old style menu with the new Ribbon?  Because it was getting to difficult to find the right menu options because the menus were too complicated.  The Ribbon is designed to make it easier to find the features that you need to use.

The Ribbon is only one third of the new user interface though… there are two other important parts of the screen which we will look at before looking specifically at the Ribbon

The Office Orb (and the Quick Access Toolbar)

The Office Orb = The old file menu.  As you can see in the picture, the orb is a circle with the Office logo in it, which is located in the top left hand corner of the application.  The Office Orb contains the same style tasks that you would find in the old file menu.  For example, if you wanted to create a new document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, in the top left corner of the screen, and then select ‘New’.  Likewise if you wanted to save your document in Word 2007, you would click on the Office Orb, and select ‘Save’.

By clicking on the Office Orb (in Word 2007), you get access to the following functionality:

  • New
  • Open
  • Save
  • Save As
  • Print
  • Finish
  • Send
  • Publish
  • Close
  • Options
  • Exit

New, Open, Save, Save As, Print, Close and Exit are all the same as previous versions of Office.  Finish, Send, and Publish are new to Word 2007, and will be covered in an Office Orb Deep Dive in a later article.

Beside the Office Orb is a number of small icons.  This is called the Quick Access Toolbar, and the default (in Word 2007) includes Save, Undo, Redo, and Print.  The Quick Access Toolbar saves you from having to look for features that you regularly use.  For example, simply click on the floppy disk to save your document.  You can add any of your favourite features in Office 2007 to the Quick Access toolbar by right clicking on the feature, and then selecting ‘Add to Quick Access Toolbar’

Zoom and Layout

The zoom and layout options are now located in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  This is where you can select the document layout you wish to view.  For example, if you want to view in Print Layout, simply click on the Print Layout button in the bottom right hand corner of the window.  If you want to change to full screen reading, or web layouts, again click on the buttons in the bottom right hand corner.

I this area there are also two methods to change the zoom, or how big or small everything looks on the screen.  One method is to click on the ‘100%’ and then select your zoom level.  Alternatively you can use the zoom slider.  By dragging the zoom slider to the left, the document will zoom out, making everything look smaller.  By dragging the zoom slider to the right, the document will zoom in, making everything look bigger. 

The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the major part of the new user interface.  It is very different from previous versions, however it is a lot easier to use, and once you are familiar with the Ribbon you are able to find things much quicker than before.

The Ribbon can be broken into two parts… the Ribbon Tabs, which describe a task which you may be trying to complete, and the Ribbon itself, which includes all the buttons and options which you would need to use when trying to complete that task.

For example, say you want to insert something into your document.  You click on the ‘Insert’ tab, and then all the things that you can insert into your document appear in the Ribbon.  From here you can ‘Insert’ a table, or ‘Insert’ a picture, or ‘Insert’ some clipart.

Another example is if you want to play around with the layout of your page.  You click on the ‘Page Layout’ tab, and from there you can select your page margins, how many columns etc.

The best part of the Ribbon is that it is contextual… which means it only shows you the things that you would want to do at the time.  For example if you click on a picture in your document, a special ‘Picture’ tab appears in the ribbon and shows you all the different things you can do to the picture.  When you are not working on the picture, that tab disappears so it does not clutter the menu and makes it simpler for you to find things!

Later on I will write some deep dive articles which tell you exactly what you can do with each ribbon tab.  Until then, I hope this article has given you enough help and guidance to start exploring Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint using the new Office 2007 user interface.  If you get stuck along the way, you can get help by clicking on the blue and white question mark on the top right hand corner of the window, or check back here at The New Paperclip for more tips, techniques and tutorials on Microsoft Office 2007

Until next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

Galleries make it easier for you to make formatting changes to your documents, pilule spreadsheets or presentations using Office 2007.

What does a Gallery look like?

Put simply, neurosurgeon galleries show you what your layout, population health formatting or colour options look like.  For example the picture on the right (click to see at full size) shows us a gallery in Word 2007 that illustrates what all the different choices are if you want to insert a coverpage into the document.  From the gallery I can look at the design and formatting of the page BEFORE clicking on it, and make a decision if I like it or not.  The gallery includes many different design layouts  which you can choose from.  If you feel very artistic you can also great your own designs to choose from.

Galleries appear in many different places throughout all the different applications in Office 2007.  In Word 2007, you can use galleries when choosing how headings look (which is called applying ‘styles’), when choosing a coverpage, when selecting the formatting of your header and footer, and even when selecting what watermark you want to appear in the document.

Galleries enable you to pick the layout, or look and feel of your document very quickly, and saves you the hassle of having to undo a change if you do not like it!

Till next time…

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Galleries, ribbon, Getting Started[/tags]

OK… this paperclip has had a very busy week.  My day job has been pretty stressful lately.  To pay the bills, store
I spend my time holding together some very important documents!  Recently more and more pages have been added to the document… and basically I am feeling the stress now!  I am trying to convince my old friend bulldog to take over… and luckily he said yes!  So now I am free to concentrate on The New Paperclip, patient
and tell you all about my favourite tips, tricks, techniques, tutorials, and terrific help articles on Microsoft Office 2007!  Hopefully I will be regularly putting together plenty of content for you all you Office 2007 lovers out there!

… in fact, read the next post for more!

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, website hair strap yourself in, view and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, order powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

That’s right… the for the next week… 7 days… 168 hours (that’s 7×24 hours thanks to my old pal Calc!) I will be living and breathing Microsoft OneNote 2007.  So sit down, hair strap yourself in, and get ready for some great OneNote reading!

So to kick OneNote 2007 week off… lets have a look at what OneNote is?

Straight from my old friends at Microsoft…

Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook that provides a flexible way to gather and organize your notes and information, powerful search capabilities so you can find what you’re looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks for teams to work together more effectively.

Whoa… there are a lot of powerful words there that this paperclip just doesn’t understand.  Basically, OneNote is a great tool which you can use to collect things you want to collect, and then search for them later.  Just like a notebook, but electronic, and no paper! 

How do I use OneNote?  If I am surfing the web, or reading a document, and find a paragraph or something I want to keep for later reference, I just copy and paste it into OneNote.  I can copy and paste text, links, emails, pictures, PowerPoint presentations, audio, pretty much anything I like!

So basically, if you want to organise all your note taking, research or brainstorming… OneNote is the way to go!

Next up we will look at the specifics of using OneNote 2007!

Till next time

TNP πŸ™‚

So you are taking notes in a Mathematics lecture, glands
or taking down some dollar figures in a sales meeting… and need to quickly calculate some numbers… what do you do?  Just type it into OneNote 2007!

Here is how.  Simply type what you want to calculate.  For example if I wanted to know what 1453 divided by 3 equals, I would type 1453/3= anywhere on the page.  Once you hit enter, somewhere deep inside OneNote a couple of electrons get together over coffee and discuss what the answer is, and then return it to the screen.  Very nice feature to keep in mind next time you need to know what something plus something is, or what something minus something is, or what something multiplied by…. ok I think you get the picture πŸ™‚

Ever imagined being able to check in and check out OneNote pages and notebooks from your favourite Document Management System?  My good old friends at Microsoft have put together a technical article which runs through what you need to know to get started.

You can find the article, sick funnily enough called “Integrating OneNote 2007 with a Document Management System” by Alex Simmons on MSDN

’till next time

TNP (The New Paperclip) πŸ™‚

[tags]OneNote 2007, Document Management, Records Management[/tags]

Ever wondered why there isn’t a save button in OneNote?  Because OneNote automatically saves your work as you go.  That is great to know, mind but what if you are working away at your masterpiece, page the best idea you have ever had… and you loose power!!!  Have you lost all your work?

Well that depends on where the file is located.  OneNote will save the work to automatically at specific intervals, depending on where you saved the OneNote file.

  • Local Drive – every 5 seconds
  • UNC Share – every 30 seconds
  • SharePoint library – every 10 minutes
  • HTTP share – every 10 minutes

So the moral of the story is that if you are working on an idea in a very fast paced manner… probably best to work off the local drive.  If you like to take your time to think things over, then storing your OneNote files remotely is the way to go.

[tags]OneNote 2007, Recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Ok… I didn’t mean to scare all you OneNote fans out there.  The picture isn’t as bleak as I made it out in my last post about how often OneNote automatically saves your work.  Luckily Chris Pratley, decease one of the team at Microsoft responsible for OneNote put me on the straight and narrow!

Keep in mind that with OneNote 2007 you are always working against a local cache. The times you list are the intervals between replication events to those servers (which are long because http servers are slow relative to UNC shares). The saves to the cache however happen every few seconds. So even if the server goes away (because you took your laptop out of range of your wireless or some other problem), caries you never lose any data. And of course you can keep working while not connected to the server and the replication will take place when the server is available again.

Cheers,
Chris

 

Thanks Chris!  So there you have it… saving to the local cache means that your thoughts, notes and ideas are safe and sound!

[tags]OneNote 2007, recoverability[/tags]

Thinking about purchasing or deploying OneNote 2007?  Probably a good idea to take a look at the following requirements to see if your hardware is up to scratch (these also apply for the entire Office suite)

OS: Windows XP Service Pack 2 or later (or Windows Server 2003 or higher)

CPU: 500 megahertz (MHz) or higher

RAM: 256 megabytes (MB)

Hard Disk: 2 gigabyte (GB) or higher

Monitor or Screen Resolution: 800×600, nurse
1024×768 or higher recommended.

To check if your computer meets the requirements, life
go to this Office Online Help page for more information

[tags]OneNote 2007, Minimum Requirements[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

There comes a time in everyone’s life when you don’t really have the inspiration to write pages and pages of content.  Whether you have spent hours working on a fantastic document layout, implant or are just plain lazy, there are options to make it look like you have put extra work in πŸ™‚

Word 2007

In Word 2007 you have two options for filler text.  The first is the traditional ‘Lorem Ipsum’ pig Latin.  Lorem Ipsum has been the standard filler text for centuries, and is used when you want viewers to focus on layout and presentation, instead of just content.  To get a few paragraphs of Lorem Ipsum, simply type the following and press enter

=lorem()

The result is the following…

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa. Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna.

Nunc viverra imperdiet enim. Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Proin pharetra nonummy pede. Mauris et orci.

The second option for filler text in Word 2007 is just some random text from one of the Office 2007 help files.  To get some random, yet English looking text, type…

=rand()

The end result is the following…

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

You can easily change the formatting of selected text in the document text by choosing a look for the selected text from the Quick Styles gallery on the Home tab. You can also format text directly by using the other controls on the Home tab. Most controls offer a choice of using the look from the current theme or using a format that you specify directly.

To change the overall look of your document, choose new Theme elements on the Page Layout tab. To change the looks available in the Quick Style gallery, use the Change Current Quick Style Set command. Both the Themes gallery and the Quick Styles gallery provide reset commands so that you can always restore the look of your document to the original contained in your current template.

PowerPoint 2007

Only one option in PowerPoint 2007… and it is a classic.  Again like the random text in Word, type =rand() followed by enter.  The resulting text is…

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Excel 2007

Again only one option in Excel, however this time you are generating a random number.  =rand() in a cell produces a random number.

[tags]Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007, Random, Filler, Lorem Ipsum[/tags]

Looking to download the latest bits for Office 2007?  You can download the patch for Office 2007 Beta 2 from Microsoft right now.  The download is about 495MB, and
so you might have to grab a coffee or two whilst you wait (especially on 56K, vitamin
it will take just over 20 hours to download).

Hopefully I will be bringing you a visual tour of Office 2007 Beta 2 TR in the near future.  In the mean time… get downloading!

[tags]Office 2007, Beta, Download[/tags]

For many, tablets
students particularly, try
word count is a very important feature in Word.  I remember the good old days when back at Paperclip school.  When completing school assignments, Sildenafil
for some reason it not the quality of your writing that counted, but your ability to write as close as possible to 3000 words on a topic!

For those of you who feel the pain of word-limit assessment, or are simply interested in knowing how many words are in a document, Word 2007 makes it easier for you.

Firstly, you do not have to go looking for the word count feature.  In Word 2003 and previous versions, word count was hidden in the menu structure.  That is no more.

Word count now appears in the bottom left hand corner of the Word 2007 interface.  As you type, it will automatically update with the current word count.

But what if you want to know how many words are in a selection of text that you just made?  Simple.  Just select your text, and look back at the bottom left hand corner of the screen.  Word displays both the number of words in the selected text, and the total number of words in the document.

Finally if you want detailed statistics on the number of pages, words, paragraphs, characters (with and without spaces), and the number of lines in your document, simply click on the word count box which we have been talking about during this article.  A word count dialog box will appear with all the statistics you need.

Until next time!

TNP πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Microsoft Office 2007, Word Count, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header, there
or footer is on your document.  This will activate the Header & Footer Tools Design tab in the Ribbon.  Then, more about
Page Number should appear as one of the features available.  Click on the Page Number drop down menu and you have a number of options.  At this stage you need to decide whether you want the page numbers to appear in the header of the document, in the footer of the document, or in the margin of the document.  Once you decide that, select you preferred page number style and formatting.

or…

2) Click on the Insert tab in the Ribbon, and then the Header & Footer group.  You will find the Page Number drop down here.  Again, select the location that you wish the page numbers to appear, and the style and formatting.

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Page Numbers[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, dosage anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

In my last post on Word Count in Word 2007, anorexia we saw how we can quickly find out how many words are in a document, how many words are in a selection of text, and how we can find some general statistics about the document.  But what if that isn’t enough?  Well, there are a few more statistics hidden away behind the status bar which you can easily bring to the light of day.

To configure the status bar to show these deeper statistics (as well as some other aspects of the status bar), simply right click on the word count (or if it does not appear for some reason, right click anywhere on the status bar).

From this menu we can see a number of different statistics that we can place on the status bar.  They are: Formatted Page Number, Section Number, Page Number, Vertical Page Position, Line Number, and Column.  In the status bar configuration menu, you can see the current value of each of those statistics.  However, if you want to place those statistics on the status bar, so you can quickly scan to see what the current figures are, simply click (and tick) the relevant statistic in the status bar configuration menu.

The final result is a status bar that illustrates exactly what statistics you need to know about the document you are currently working on.

[tags]Office 2007, Word 2007, Statistics, Tutorial[/tags]

The first of hopefully many screencasts is now live on The New Paperclip.Β  This Screencast is an introduction to the new menu system in Word 2007, advice
called the Ribbon UI.

The Screencast, thumb
An Introduction to the New User Interface in Word 2007, covers the basics of what the Ribbon is, what the tabs are and why they are there, and how to find your favourite Word commands (for example, how to change the font, its size or colour, as well as where the File menu is)

This is a Word 2007 tutorial for beginners.Β  Future screencasts will dive into deeper topics, but this is a nice starting point!Β  Enjoy πŸ™‚

[tags]Word 2007, Tutorial, Screencast[/tags]

To insert a page number into your Word 2007 document, apoplexy
you have two options

1) Double click where the header,