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All you need to do is register using this form

Be more productive with Office 2007!  Subscribe to the regular Office 2007 Tips and Tricks newsletter.  Brought to you by TheNewPaperclip.com

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Register today and you will receive a free copy of my e-book “Your 10 minute guide to getting up to speed with Microsoft Office 2007”

’till next time!
TNP 😉

Keeping up to date with the latest Office 2007 Help, medicine Tips, Tricks and Tutorials from TheNewPaperclip.com is easy.  There are three options you can choose from to receive regular help and productivity tips!

1) Subscribe to the email newsletter!

To get a regular newsletter packed full of help, tips, tricks and tutorials for Word 2007, Outlook 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007 and the rest of the Microsoft Office 2007 suite, simply fill in this registration form below!  PLUS you get a free copy of my ebook when you confirm your registration!

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Simply open up your favourite feed reader, and subscribe to the feed – http://feeds.feedburner.com/TheNewPaperclip

3) Follow The New Paperclip on Twitter!

That’s right, you can how get Office 2007 productivity tips as soon as they are published simply by following @thenewpaperclip on Twitter!
Keeping up to date with the latest Office 2007 Help, obesity Tips, visit web Tricks and Tutorials from TheNewPaperclip.com is easy.  There are three options you can choose from to receive regular help and productivity tips!

1) Subscribe to the email newsletter!

To get a regular newsletter packed full of help, information pills tips, tricks and tutorials for Word 2007, Outlook 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007 and the rest of the Microsoft Office 2007 suite, simply fill in this registration form below!  PLUS you get a free copy of my ebook when you confirm your registration!

2) Subscribe to the RSS feed!

Simply open up your favourite feed reader, and subscribe to the feed – http://feeds.feedburner.com/TheNewPaperclip

3) Follow The New Paperclip on Twitter!

That’s right, you can how get Office 2007 productivity tips as soon as they are published simply by following @thenewpaperclip on Twitter!
Keeping up to date with the latest Office 2007 Help, obesity Tips, visit web Tricks and Tutorials from TheNewPaperclip.com is easy.  There are three options you can choose from to receive regular help and productivity tips!

1) Subscribe to the email newsletter!

To get a regular newsletter packed full of help, information pills tips, tricks and tutorials for Word 2007, Outlook 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Excel 2007 and the rest of the Microsoft Office 2007 suite, simply fill in this registration form below!  PLUS you get a free copy of my ebook when you confirm your registration!

2) Subscribe to the RSS feed!

Simply open up your favourite feed reader, and subscribe to the feed – http://feeds.feedburner.com/TheNewPaperclip

3) Follow The New Paperclip on Twitter!

That’s right, you can how get Office 2007 productivity tips as soon as they are published simply by following @thenewpaperclip on Twitter!
Are you a member of the Twitterverse?  If you use the micro-blogging service called Twitter, ask
you can how get your favorite productivity articles on Word, gerontologist
Outlook, Excel, PowerPoint… in fact the entire Microsoft Office 2007 suite directly in your Twitter feed.

All you have to do is follow @TheNewPaperclip.

I will be on there regularly so if you have any questions or suggestions for articles you can post them to Twitter as well!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Subscribe to the Office 2007 Help, Tips, Tricks and Tutorials Newsletter

Did you know that you can get a regular email jam packed with Office 2007 tips direct from TheNewPaperclip.com!

All you need to do is register using this form

Register today and you will receive a free copy of my e-book “Your 10 minute guide to getting up to speed with Microsoft Office 2007”

’till next time!
TNP 😉

Capture your New Years Resolutions with OneNote 2007 and Outlook 2007

I noticed one of my colleagues the other day struggling with her Excel Spreadsheet (yep that’s right, ed purchase even TNP needs a day job to pay the mortgage!). 

She had a sheet with a few hundred rows in it – all containing information about people who had registered to attend an event.  I noticed that she was trying to count how many people from each state had registered.

I popped over and suggested that she use a Pivot Table.

What is a Pivot Table?

A Pivot Table in Excel 2007 is a pretty powerful, implant yet simple way to slice and dice the data in your spreadsheet.  It can help you summarise hundreds, visit web thousands, even millions of rows (in Excel 2007 at least) into information that you can take action on!  And because you can quickly change how you view your data, it can be a really useful tool to use in the business world.

So how do you create a simple Pivot Table in Excel 2007? 

Well first, you need some data in your spreadsheet that you want to slice and dice.  Once you have the data – maybe it is a list of customers, a list of products, or a list of transactions including customers AND products… you can then start Pivoting!

  1. Make sure there are no blank rows or blank columns where all you data is in your spreadsheet (extra rows and columns after all your data is ok though)
  2. Click on the “Insert” tab in the ribbon
  3. Look for the “Tables” group. 
  4. The very first button in that group should be “Pivot Table”.  Click on that
  5. Select “Pivot Table”
  6. A little box will appear, and Excel 2007 will take an educated guess at what data you want to include in your pivot table.  Excel is generally pretty good and picking the data, so don’t worry about that part – but make sure you look at the bottom half of that box.  Excel is asking you where you want your pivot table to appear.  I suggest you choose a “New Worksheet” and then click “OK”
  7. You will now notice what looks like a “Task Pane” appear in the right hand side of your Excel window.
  8. In the top half of that task pane, select the fields that you want to include in your pivot table – basically you need to pick the information you want to slice and dice!
  9. In the bottom half of that task pane, play around with where those fields sit in the Pivot Table.  You can filter based on certain fields, you can add fields as row or column labels, or you can get summary values for the contents of cells – you take your pick.  It is best to play around and experiment at this stage to get the exact outcome you want, simply because there are so many ways you might want to slice and dice that data.
  10. When you are done, just close that task pan by clicking the “x” at the top of it (make sure you click the one at the top of the Task Pane, and not the one on the top of the window! that will close Excel!)
  11. Now play around with your pivot table, and impress your boss!

Whilst it might look a little complicated to begin with, the best advice I can give is to give Pivot Tables a go and simply experiment with some data.  Then you will see the true potential of how much time this great feature of Excel could save you!

’till next time!
TNP 😉

I noticed one of my colleagues the other day struggling with her Excel Spreadsheet (yep that’s right, purchase even TNP needs a day job to pay the mortgage!). 

She had a sheet with a few hundred rows in it – all containing information about people who had registered to attend an event.  I noticed that she was trying to count how many people from each state had registered.

I popped over and suggested that she use a Pivot Table.

What is a Pivot Table?

A Pivot Table in Excel 2007 is a pretty powerful, yet simple way to slice and dice the data in your spreadsheet.  It can help you summarise hundreds, thousands, even millions of rows (in Excel 2007 at least) into information that you can take action on!  And because you can quickly change how you view your data, it can be a really useful tool to use in the business world.

So how do you create a simple Pivot Table in Excel 2007? 

Well first, you need some data in your spreadsheet that you want to slice and dice.  Once you have the data – maybe it is a list of customers, a list of products, or a list of transactions including customers AND products… you can then start Pivoting!

  1. Make sure there are no blank rows or blank columns where all you data is in your spreadsheet (extra rows and columns after all your data is ok though)
  2. Click on the “Insert” tab in the ribbon
  3. Look for the “Tables” group. 
  4. The very first button in that group should be “Pivot Table”.  Click on that
  5. Select “Pivot Table”
  6. A little box will appear, and Excel 2007 will take an educated guess at what data you want to include in your pivot table.  Excel is generally pretty good and picking the data, so don’t worry about that part – but make sure you look at the bottom half of that box.  Excel is asking you where you want your pivot table to appear.  I suggest you choose a “New Worksheet” and then click “OK”
  7. You will now notice what looks like a “Task Pane” appear in the right hand side of your Excel window.
  8. In the top half of that task pane, select the fields that you want to include in your pivot table – basically you need to pick the information you want to slice and dice!
  9. In the bottom half of that task pane, play around with where those fields sit in the Pivot Table.  You can filter based on certain fields, you can add fields as row or column labels, or you can get summary values for the contents of cells – you take your pick.  It is best to play around and experiment at this stage to get the exact outcome you want, simply because there are so many ways you might want to slice and dice that data.
  10. When you are done, just close that task pan by clicking the “x” at the top of it (make sure you click the one at the top of the Task Pane, and not the one on the top of the window! that will close Excel!)
  11. Now play around with your pivot table, and impress your boss!

Whilst it might look a little complicated to begin with, the best advice I can give is to give Pivot Tables a go and simply experiment with some data.  Then you will see the true potential of how much time this great feature of Excel could save you!

’till next time!
TNP 😉

Say you have a nice long list of names.  But they are just all over the place.  Wouldn’t it be good to be able to sort them into alphabetical order?

Well in Word 2007 it is a piece of cake!  Assuming you have each item in your list on a separate line…

  1. Select the text you want to sort alphabetically
  2. Make sure you are on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon
  3. Look for the “Paragraph” group
  4. Click on the sort button (that is the one with an "A on top of a Z”
  5. A box will appear – if you want straight alphabetical order on your paragraphs just hit ok.
  6. If you want reverse alphabetical order, surgery
    make sure you select “Descending”

Using the sort button you can also sort numerically, order
or by date!  Simply change the “Type” of sort you want to do in the “Sort Text” box.

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

I noticed one of my colleagues the other day struggling with her Excel Spreadsheet (yep that’s right, purchase even TNP needs a day job to pay the mortgage!). 

She had a sheet with a few hundred rows in it – all containing information about people who had registered to attend an event.  I noticed that she was trying to count how many people from each state had registered.

I popped over and suggested that she use a Pivot Table.

What is a Pivot Table?

A Pivot Table in Excel 2007 is a pretty powerful, yet simple way to slice and dice the data in your spreadsheet.  It can help you summarise hundreds, thousands, even millions of rows (in Excel 2007 at least) into information that you can take action on!  And because you can quickly change how you view your data, it can be a really useful tool to use in the business world.

So how do you create a simple Pivot Table in Excel 2007? 

Well first, you need some data in your spreadsheet that you want to slice and dice.  Once you have the data – maybe it is a list of customers, a list of products, or a list of transactions including customers AND products… you can then start Pivoting!

  1. Make sure there are no blank rows or blank columns where all you data is in your spreadsheet (extra rows and columns after all your data is ok though)
  2. Click on the “Insert” tab in the ribbon
  3. Look for the “Tables” group. 
  4. The very first button in that group should be “Pivot Table”.  Click on that
  5. Select “Pivot Table”
  6. A little box will appear, and Excel 2007 will take an educated guess at what data you want to include in your pivot table.  Excel is generally pretty good and picking the data, so don’t worry about that part – but make sure you look at the bottom half of that box.  Excel is asking you where you want your pivot table to appear.  I suggest you choose a “New Worksheet” and then click “OK”
  7. You will now notice what looks like a “Task Pane” appear in the right hand side of your Excel window.
  8. In the top half of that task pane, select the fields that you want to include in your pivot table – basically you need to pick the information you want to slice and dice!
  9. In the bottom half of that task pane, play around with where those fields sit in the Pivot Table.  You can filter based on certain fields, you can add fields as row or column labels, or you can get summary values for the contents of cells – you take your pick.  It is best to play around and experiment at this stage to get the exact outcome you want, simply because there are so many ways you might want to slice and dice that data.
  10. When you are done, just close that task pan by clicking the “x” at the top of it (make sure you click the one at the top of the Task Pane, and not the one on the top of the window! that will close Excel!)
  11. Now play around with your pivot table, and impress your boss!

Whilst it might look a little complicated to begin with, the best advice I can give is to give Pivot Tables a go and simply experiment with some data.  Then you will see the true potential of how much time this great feature of Excel could save you!

’till next time!
TNP 😉

Say you have a nice long list of names.  But they are just all over the place.  Wouldn’t it be good to be able to sort them into alphabetical order?

Well in Word 2007 it is a piece of cake!  Assuming you have each item in your list on a separate line…

  1. Select the text you want to sort alphabetically
  2. Make sure you are on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon
  3. Look for the “Paragraph” group
  4. Click on the sort button (that is the one with an "A on top of a Z”
  5. A box will appear – if you want straight alphabetical order on your paragraphs just hit ok.
  6. If you want reverse alphabetical order, surgery
    make sure you select “Descending”

Using the sort button you can also sort numerically, order
or by date!  Simply change the “Type” of sort you want to do in the “Sort Text” box.

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Do you like to have a copy of your schedule with you all the time?  Would managing your time be simpler if you could have a printed copy of your Outlook calendar with you as you travel from meeting to meeting?

Printing out your calendar is a piece of cake in Outlook 2007!

  1. Click on “Calendar” so you are looking at your calendar, no rx
    and not your email!
  2. Select the view you want to print out – it could be a day, a week, a month, or a custom date range
  3. Click on the File menu, and select “Print”

Simple as that!  And remember if you are not sure of which calendar print out you want, that you can Print Preview to see exactly what you are going to get before doing the final print!

By the way, printing a blank calendar in Outlook 2007 on month view is a really nice, and inexpensive way to put a calendar up in your office cubicle, or on your fridge at home to keep track of family events!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

I noticed one of my colleagues the other day struggling with her Excel Spreadsheet (yep that’s right, purchase even TNP needs a day job to pay the mortgage!). 

She had a sheet with a few hundred rows in it – all containing information about people who had registered to attend an event.  I noticed that she was trying to count how many people from each state had registered.

I popped over and suggested that she use a Pivot Table.

What is a Pivot Table?

A Pivot Table in Excel 2007 is a pretty powerful, yet simple way to slice and dice the data in your spreadsheet.  It can help you summarise hundreds, thousands, even millions of rows (in Excel 2007 at least) into information that you can take action on!  And because you can quickly change how you view your data, it can be a really useful tool to use in the business world.

So how do you create a simple Pivot Table in Excel 2007? 

Well first, you need some data in your spreadsheet that you want to slice and dice.  Once you have the data – maybe it is a list of customers, a list of products, or a list of transactions including customers AND products… you can then start Pivoting!

  1. Make sure there are no blank rows or blank columns where all you data is in your spreadsheet (extra rows and columns after all your data is ok though)
  2. Click on the “Insert” tab in the ribbon
  3. Look for the “Tables” group. 
  4. The very first button in that group should be “Pivot Table”.  Click on that
  5. Select “Pivot Table”
  6. A little box will appear, and Excel 2007 will take an educated guess at what data you want to include in your pivot table.  Excel is generally pretty good and picking the data, so don’t worry about that part – but make sure you look at the bottom half of that box.  Excel is asking you where you want your pivot table to appear.  I suggest you choose a “New Worksheet” and then click “OK”
  7. You will now notice what looks like a “Task Pane” appear in the right hand side of your Excel window.
  8. In the top half of that task pane, select the fields that you want to include in your pivot table – basically you need to pick the information you want to slice and dice!
  9. In the bottom half of that task pane, play around with where those fields sit in the Pivot Table.  You can filter based on certain fields, you can add fields as row or column labels, or you can get summary values for the contents of cells – you take your pick.  It is best to play around and experiment at this stage to get the exact outcome you want, simply because there are so many ways you might want to slice and dice that data.
  10. When you are done, just close that task pan by clicking the “x” at the top of it (make sure you click the one at the top of the Task Pane, and not the one on the top of the window! that will close Excel!)
  11. Now play around with your pivot table, and impress your boss!

Whilst it might look a little complicated to begin with, the best advice I can give is to give Pivot Tables a go and simply experiment with some data.  Then you will see the true potential of how much time this great feature of Excel could save you!

’till next time!
TNP 😉

Say you have a nice long list of names.  But they are just all over the place.  Wouldn’t it be good to be able to sort them into alphabetical order?

Well in Word 2007 it is a piece of cake!  Assuming you have each item in your list on a separate line…

  1. Select the text you want to sort alphabetically
  2. Make sure you are on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon
  3. Look for the “Paragraph” group
  4. Click on the sort button (that is the one with an "A on top of a Z”
  5. A box will appear – if you want straight alphabetical order on your paragraphs just hit ok.
  6. If you want reverse alphabetical order, surgery
    make sure you select “Descending”

Using the sort button you can also sort numerically, order
or by date!  Simply change the “Type” of sort you want to do in the “Sort Text” box.

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Do you like to have a copy of your schedule with you all the time?  Would managing your time be simpler if you could have a printed copy of your Outlook calendar with you as you travel from meeting to meeting?

Printing out your calendar is a piece of cake in Outlook 2007!

  1. Click on “Calendar” so you are looking at your calendar, no rx
    and not your email!
  2. Select the view you want to print out – it could be a day, a week, a month, or a custom date range
  3. Click on the File menu, and select “Print”

Simple as that!  And remember if you are not sure of which calendar print out you want, that you can Print Preview to see exactly what you are going to get before doing the final print!

By the way, printing a blank calendar in Outlook 2007 on month view is a really nice, and inexpensive way to put a calendar up in your office cubicle, or on your fridge at home to keep track of family events!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

Is your inbox overflowing like mine?  Want to know how you can you quickly focus on what you need to action?  Well here is a nifty way to do it.

In Outlook 2007, medical you can organise your emails using views.  What is a view you say?  Basically think of it of a different way to look at all the emails you have.

In Outlook 2007 there are a number of views you can “view” your emails with:

  • Messages
  • Messages with Auto Preview
  • Messages from the Last Seven Days
  • Unread Messages in a particular folder
  • Messages sent to me
  • Messages in a timeline (very cool!)
  • and some more complicated views like Outlook Data Files, medicine
    and Documents

So how do you change the view of your inbox?

Simple. 

  1. Click on the folder you want to organise (ie your Inbox).
  2. Click on the tools menu
  3. Select “Organize”
  4. In the window that appears, Hemorrhoids
    click “Using Views”
  5. Select your favourite view

If you want to get really tricky you can create your own custom view by clicking the “Customize Current View” button in the top right hand corner of that box.  You can customise your view with different fields, group by’s, sorts. filters and other settings.

How cool is that!

‘till next time!
TNP 😉

So you are about to do a presentation – maybe it is at an event or a tradeshow – and instead of using a projector, population health your are presenting your slides using a plasma or LCD tv.

When you practice your presentation on your computer or on a projector, pilule your slides look fine.  But as soon as you try your deck on the plasma or LCD, your slides stretch and look horrible!

How do you get your slides to look perfect on the plasma?

Did you know that you can change the size, shape, and orientation of your slides in PowerPoint 2007!

You can set up your presentation for different “On Screen” sizes, such as 4:3 (which is the default), or 16:9 and 16:10 aspect ratios, which are perfect for widescreen plasma panels!

(just as an aside, you can also select different paper sizes as well if you want to build your slides specifically for printing as opposed to being used on screen – but we can talk about that another day!)

To change your slides from standard to widescreen

  1. In PowerPoint 2007, click on the “Design” tab on the Ribbon
  2. Look for the “Page Setup” group
  3. Click on “Page Setup”
  4. Look for the “Slides sized for:” drop down box, and select either “On-screen Show (16:9)” or “On-screen Show (16:10)
  5. Click “OK”

Now you will have noticed the shape of your slides has changed from being close to a square, to more like a rectangle – and you will find that your graphics and text will no longer distort when you show your presentations on those fancy plasma screens!

Now get out there and impress those customers!

’till next time!
TNP 😉

Well… hasn’t 2008 gone quickly!

Now that Christmas is just past us, search now is the time to start thinking about your new years resolutions.

Most people usually say the same thing every year… I am going to exercise more… I am going to work less etc etc.  But most of the time by mid-February you are already way off track.

The key to a good new years resolution is to be specific, dosage and to write it down somewhere so you are reminded of it.  What better place to do that than in OneNote 2007!

Here is how to make a record of your resolutions… AND be reminded to actually work on them.

1) Write your resolutions in OneNote

2) Tag your resolutions with a specific tag from (you guessed it!) the “Tag” button.  If your resolution is to do a generic task, buy information pills tag it with a “To Do” tag.  If it is a little more specific – say, watch a movie… then tag it with the “Movie to See” tag.  There are dozens of tags you can choose from to give you a visual cue regarding your resolution.

Easy so far right?  Well, now with a little help from Outlook 2007, we can now be reminded throughout the year to work on our resolutions!

3) In OneNote 2007, you will see a “Task” button just to the left of the “Tag” button in the menu.  By selecting one of the “Task” options for your resolution, it can now appear as a task whenever you open Outlook.  So now whenever you are checking your email, your calendar, or your task list… you will have a gentle reminder to work on your new years resolutions, throughout the year.

 

So there you have it, you really have no excuses not to achieve your resolutions this year!

’till next time!
TNP 😉

Office DevCon 2008 – Sydney, Australia

There have been dozens of comments recently on my previous post about Changing the default reminder time in Outlook 2007.  The comments are not about the default reminder time for appointments… but rather the default reminder time for follow up flags.  The concern being that it is really strange that the default is 4pm and it seems there is no easy way to change that to something more acceptable (like 8am).

I would like to discuss this a little to hopefully help everyone out. Whilst on the surface it might look annoying (especially for those how have just moved to Outlook 2007)… there is actually a good reason why the default reminder is 4pm.

First lets talk about Outlook 2003

In Outlook 2003, medications a follow up flag is a follow up flag. You set a time and a date for the reminder and that is that.

In Outlook 2007 however, price there are different types of follow up flags. There is a “Today” follow up flag, urticaria a “Tomorrow” follow up flag, a “This Week”, a “Next Week” and a “Custom”. Obviously, if you use a “Today” follow up flag (which is the default), it will remind you today. If you set a “Tomorrow” follow up flag, it will remind you tomorrow.

The “Today” flag is designed to remind you about things that you need to finish before you go home from work today… hence why it the default is for it to remind you 1 hour before the end of your work day (which would be 4pm in most cases).

As the “Tomorrow” flag is designed to remind you about things to do tomorrow, it will remind you by default at the start of the next work day (8am in most cases).

So say you want to have your default reminder first thing tomorrow morning? Then it is easy to change the default flag that is set. Simply right click on where you currently set your flag, and then in the pop up menu click on “Set Quick Click”. Change the default to “Tomorrow” and your default reminders will now be 8am on the next business day.

Hope that helps clear up some of the confusion around follow up flags. I can understand why it would be confusion coming from Outlook 2003, however with the new flexibility to set different types of flags, Outlook 2007 gives you a lot more control over when you get your reminders.

’till next time!
TNP 😉

PS. If you want to learn more about the default times, you can look at this Office Online help page – http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook/HA012317831033.aspx

Are you an Office freak from down-under?

On the weekend of the 15th and 16th of November, try a group of Aussie Office fanatics are putting together a conference called Office DevCon2008.  From what is on the agenda it looks like a great event for anyone involved in managing Office products in their workplace, seek or for those interested in getting a little more intimate with the Office 2007 suite, patient SharePoint and more.

Registration is free… and there might be sneak previews of Office 14 as well!

If you are in Sydney in mid November, make sure you check it out.  You never know, you might bump into yours truly there as well 🙂

You can find out more by visiting the Office DevCon 2008 website

’till next time!
TNP 😉

Reduce your carbon footprint with Microsoft Office 2007

Have you ever noticed if you select some text in Microsoft Word 2007 you get a little pop-up menu.  You know the one, physician it lets you change the font, apoplectic the font size, anabolics the font colour and a lot more.

Some people think it is great.  Some people think it is annoying.

I think it is great, but as a service to you, I will let you know how to turn it off, and stop it from popping up!

  1. Click on the menu – the “Office Orb” (that circle in the top left hand corner which used to be the file menu!)
  2. Click on “Word Options”
  3. Look in the “Popular section”, under “Top options for working with Word
  4. Untick the “Show Mini Toolbar on selection” checkbox
  5. Hit ok

There you go – no more annoying (not) popup mini menu in Word 2007

’till next time

TNP 😉

 

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How many times have you lost everything in your document?  Word crashed?  Maybe the power went out?  Whatever it was that happened… I bet it happened just before you were going to save, pharm right?

By default, medicine Word 2007 makes an Auto Recover save every 10 minutes.  But if you are clumsy like me, or don’t trust your computer… you can set Word to autosave your document a lot more than normal.  Here is how:

  1. Click on the old file menu (the office orb)
  2. Click on "Word Options"
  3. Click on the "Save" option in the left hand menu
  4. In the first section "Save Documents", look for the second line which reads something like "Save AutoRecover information every XX minutes
  5. Set your preferred time.  Mine is now every 1 minute 🙂

Just remember when increasing the AutoRecover frequency… that you do see a slight performance hit every time it saves.  Not really noticeable every 10 minutes, but when it happens every 60 seconds it could be annoying!

’till next time!

TNP 😉

 

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Have you ever poured your heart and soul into absolutely awesome background in your word doc?  Maybe you coloured it bright yellow, therapist or purple, what is ed or ‘mother of pearl’? 

It looks great on the screen, but when you print it… you can’t see it!

Did you know by default Microsoft Word 2007 that background colors and images are not printed?

It is easy to print them out though.  Here is how:

  1. Open the file menu (the circle in the top left hand corner of the screen
  2. Click on "Word Options"
  3. Click on "Display" in the left hand menu
  4. Look in the "Printing options" section"
  5. Tick the "Print background colors and images" check box
  6. Click ok

How easy!  Just a word of warning though… printing a bright yellow background on every page will not only cost you an arm and a leg in ink and toner, but will also require you and your colleagues to invest in sunglasses.

 

’till next time!

TNP 😉

 

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Have you ever noticed if you select some text in Microsoft Excel 2007 you get a little pop-up menu.  You know the one, advice it lets you change the font, what is ed the font size, see the font colour and a lot more.

Some people think it is great.  Some people think it is annoying.

I think it is great, but as a service to you, I will let you know how to turn it off, and stop it from popping up!

  1. Click on the menu – the “Office Orb” (that circle in the top left hand corner which used to be the file menu!)
  2. Click on “Excel Options”
  3. Look in the “Popular section”, under “Top options for working with Excel
  4. Untick the “Show Mini Toolbar on selection” checkbox
  5. Hit ok

There you go – no more annoying (not) popup mini menu in Excel 2007

’till next time!

TNP 😉

 

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Are you a little worried by some of the names of the documents you have recently opened in Word 2007?  Scared your boss might catch you out updating your resume, therapist working on your next novel or simply working on things that you shouldn’t?  Well this little trick will help you out!  Basically, cough how to get rid of all those recent documents that Word 2007 lists for you.

  1. Open "Word Options" by clicking on the Office Button, and then looking for the "Word Options" button
  2. Click on the Advanced Section
  3. Scroll down to the "Display" Section
  4. The first option in the "Display" Section is "Show This Number of Recent Documents" – set that to "0"
  5. Click "Ok"

There you have it – no more recent documents means no more strife from your boss! 

But just in case you have a change of heart in the future, you can turn on recent documents again simply by changing the "0" to something like "5" or "17", depending on how many you want to see.

’till next time!
TNP 😉

 

Technorati Tags:

Want to be a desktop publishing great, diagnosis spreadsheeting wiz or PowerPoint guru and help the environment at the same time?

Guess what – you might be already!

Microsoft have released an extra section on Microsoft Office Online called Lighten up: Reduce your carbon footprint and workplace costs.

Obviously they left one tip for reducing your impact on the environment… instead of investing in all those Office 2007 self help books, artificial why not just bookmark your favourite Office 2007 help, tips, tricks and tutorial site!

 

’till next time!

TNP 😉

 

Technorati Tags: ,

I have a friend on the inside…

Have you ever seen those spreadsheets or charts where the text isn’t normal?  You know the ones where the text is diagonal, neurosurgeon rheumatologist or vertical, resuscitator or on its side?  It is a pretty nifty trick you can use to display more information in less space.  And in Excel 2007 it is really easy to do.

How to change text orientation in Excel 2007

  1. Type the text into a cell
  2. Select the cell
  3. On the home tab of the ribbon, rx look for the alignment group.  There you will find a button with an ‘a’ and a ‘b’ and an arrow all on an angle.  That’s the Orientation menu.  Click on the little drop down arrow beside it.
  4. Select one of the quick options to angle your text

If you want to be more specific about the angle of your text, you can select “Format Cell Alignment” and set down to the degree how “slanty” you want your text.

The results are pretty impressive – well your boss will think so and that is all that matters right?

’till next time!
TNP 😉

Want to know lots of in depth techincal stuff about Microsoft Office?  Well if I can’t answer it, order there are plenty of people at Microsoft who know their stuff!

One of them is Alistair Speirs, generic a Office Technology Specialst at Microsoft Australia.  If you want to dive deep into everything office (beyond the tutorials from yours truely!) then you should check out his blog…

http://blogs.msdn.com/alspeirs/

Check out some of his posts on Business Desktop Deployment, clinic Enterprise Search, Office Busines Applications, OpenXML, and one he stole from me… Random text in Word 🙂

TNP and Alistair go way back… he knows his stuff!

’till next time!
TNP 😉

Deploying Office 2007 in the Enterprise

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

I am sure as soon as you thought about upgrading to Office 2007 and looked at the options available, sale
you thought – “dang it, this is going to be hard work deciphering exactly what version (or SKU) of Office I should buy.” 

Well let me save you the hassle and let you know exactly what you are getting when you purchase Microsoft Office Professional 2007:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing / document reading and creation needs
  • Excel 2007
    For crunching the numbers
  • PowerPoint 2007
    For presenting information to your peers
  • Outlook 2007 (with Business Contact Manager)
    To keep in touch with your colleagues through email (and keep track of customer details using the Business Contact Manager)
  • Access 2007
    To build databases to store your important business data
  • Publisher 2007
    To produce professional looking documents, marketing collateral, reports, business cards, banners, signs, websites etc.
  • Accounting Express 2007
    To make managing the finances of your small business (or your EBay empire!) easy

There are two different versions of Microsoft Office Professional 2007 that you can buy.  The first is a full version of the product, which you need to buy if you do not currently have a version of Office on your computer. 

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

I am sure as soon as you thought about upgrading to Office 2007 and looked at the options available, sale
you thought – “dang it, this is going to be hard work deciphering exactly what version (or SKU) of Office I should buy.” 

Well let me save you the hassle and let you know exactly what you are getting when you purchase Microsoft Office Professional 2007:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing / document reading and creation needs
  • Excel 2007
    For crunching the numbers
  • PowerPoint 2007
    For presenting information to your peers
  • Outlook 2007 (with Business Contact Manager)
    To keep in touch with your colleagues through email (and keep track of customer details using the Business Contact Manager)
  • Access 2007
    To build databases to store your important business data
  • Publisher 2007
    To produce professional looking documents, marketing collateral, reports, business cards, banners, signs, websites etc.
  • Accounting Express 2007
    To make managing the finances of your small business (or your EBay empire!) easy

There are two different versions of Microsoft Office Professional 2007 that you can buy.  The first is a full version of the product, which you need to buy if you do not currently have a version of Office on your computer. 

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Are you a teacher, dosage
student, price
or home user of Office, misbirth
and want to upgrade or buy a full version of Office 2007?  Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 is probably the best version for you.  Why?  Well it is cheaper than most of the other office suites, but includes all the programs you are most likely to use every day.

What programs are included in Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007?

There are four different programs which come with Home and Student edition.  They are:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing, typing, document creation needs.  Great for school, college or university homework and assignments.
  • Excel 2007
    Covers all your number crunching spreadsheet needs.  Great for creating graphs and reports for your homework or assignments
  • PowerPoint 2007
    Enables you to create your own presentations.  Capture your ideas, and share them with an audience.  Again great for homework or assignments where you need to present in front of a class or audience
  • OneNote 2007
    OneNote is great for taking notes, jotting down information, and keeping track of things.  Just like a paper notebook, except electronic!  Again fantastic for school, college of university, as you can keep your research notes all in one place.

Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 (along with all other Microsoft Office suites, and individual products) will be available in late January, and will cost around USD$150

TNP 😉

Have you upgraded from Excel 2003 to Excel 2007 but are unsure where some of your favourite commands are in the new ribbon user interface?  Don’t worry… here is a quick guide for some of my (and hopefully your) favourite Excel commands:

  1. Create a New Spreadsheet in Excel 2007
    Click on the Microsoft Office button (the circle in the top left hand corner of the screen), stuff and select new
  2. Insert Rows in Excel 2007
    Click on the ‘Home’ tab of the Ribbon, and then in the ‘Cells’ group, click ‘Insert’, and then click on ‘Insert Rows’
  3. Check Spelling in Excel 2007
    Click on the ‘Review’ tab of the Ribbon, and then in the ‘Proofing’ group, click ‘Spelling’.  Or you could use the shortcut key, which is F7
  4. How to AutoSum in Excel 2007
    First select the cells that you want to AutoSum, and then click on the ‘Home’ tab, look in the ‘Editing’ group, click ‘Sum’, and then click ‘Sum’
  5. Save your Spreadsheet in Excel 2007
    You can either click on the Microsoft Office Button (the circle in the top left hand corner of the screen) and select Save (or Save As), or you can click on the Save button in the Quick Access Toolbar (you can find the Quick Access Toolbar in the top left hand corner of the screen, just near the Microsoft Office button.)

Do you want to know where all your other favourite Excel 2003 commands are hidden (I mean where your favourite buttons can be found!)?  Microsoft have put together a great tool to help you out.  You can find the Interactive Excel 2003 to Excel 2007 command reference guide on the Microsoft Office website

’till next time

TNP 😉 

[tags]Excel 2007, Office, 2007, Help, Tutorial, Command Reference[/tags]

Do you love creating documents that are full of pictures?  Are you sick and tired of the same old Clip Art that comes included with Word?  Do you need more Clip Art for Word 2007, viagra 100mg PowerPoint 2007, somnology Publisher 2007, more about or any of the Microsoft Office 2007 programs? 

You are in luck!

Microsoft have a website that has over 150,000 (that’s one hundred and fifty THOUSAND!) free images and sounds that you can add to your documents, spreadsheets, or Publisher creations.

To search through the extensive online FREE Clip Art library, all you need to do is go to the Clip Art page on Microsoft Office Online, and type your search into the box at the top of the screen!

[tags]Clip Art, Office 2007, Stock[/tags]

Do you love creating documents that are full of pictures?  Are you sick and tired of the same old Clip Art that comes included with Word?  Do you need more Clip Art for Word 2007, viagra 100mg PowerPoint 2007, somnology Publisher 2007, more about or any of the Microsoft Office 2007 programs? 

You are in luck!

Microsoft have a website that has over 150,000 (that’s one hundred and fifty THOUSAND!) free images and sounds that you can add to your documents, spreadsheets, or Publisher creations.

To search through the extensive online FREE Clip Art library, all you need to do is go to the Clip Art page on Microsoft Office Online, and type your search into the box at the top of the screen!

[tags]Clip Art, Office 2007, Stock[/tags]

So you are going on holiday and need to let everyone know that you are not going to be answering their emails, resuscitator
looking at their funny forwards, nurse or reading about Nigerian money scams in your junk mail folder!

The Out of Office Assistant looks after your inbox whilst you are away, store
by replying with a custom message whenever someone sends you an email.  The message could be as simple as “Hi, I am not in the Office, email will not be read until I return”… or could include alternative contact details, or maybe the contact details of a colleague who is looking after your job whilst you are away.

To turn on the Out of Office Assistant in Outlook 2007:

  1. On the Tools menu in Outlook 2007, click on “Out of Office Assistant”
  2. Select “I am currently Out of the Office”
  3. Type your custom message in the box below
  4. Click OK

Simple as that!  If you could not find the Out of Office Assistant button in the tools menu, it might mean you are not using an Exchange server at your workplace.  Outlook needs to be connected to an Exchange server for the Out of Office Assistant to work properly (or at all!)

When you get back from holidays… you will want to turn off your Out of Office Assistant.

In Outlook 2007, in the tools menu select “Out of Office Assistant”.  Then select “I am in the Office”

Get Smart with the Out of Office Assistant!

You can get smarter with the Out of Office Assistant in Outlook 2007… by adding additional rules to be processed whenever an email appears in your inbox.  For example, you might want to delete every email from your boss (not recommended), or move emails from a distribution list into a folder you have set up. 

To add more rules to your Out of Office Assistant… go to the tools menu again, select “Out of Office Assistant”, and then click “Add Rule”.

Now you can go on holiday and not have to worry about your email every 5 minutes!

[tags]OOF, Outlook 2007, Tips, Help, Out of Office[/tags]

Thats right… 23 Sleeps, ailment thats 552 hours, internist or  33120 minutes until Office 2007, try and Windows Vista will be available in the shops.  January 30 is not that far away!

You can pre-order your copy of Windows Vista or Office 2007 now on Amazon.com!  They can even gift wrap it for you!

Over the next three weeks I will be in overdrive making sure that you have all the tips, tricks and tutorials you need to hit the ground running as soon as you take off the shrink wrap on your own copy of Office 2007.

Make sure that you subscribe to the feed, and if you have any areas that you would like me to focus on… make sure you leave a comment!

’till next time

TNP 😉

[tags]Windows Vista, Office 2007, Launch[/tags]

Inserting tables in Word 2007 has changed slightly from previous versions of Office, buy however it really is a piece of cake with the new Ribbon user interface, and my favourite feature of all… live preview!

  1. On the ribbon, click “Insert” (because we want to “Insert” a table)
  2. Click on the “Table” button,  and a grid will appear below it.
  3. Drag your mouse over the grid, selecting the number of columns and rows that you would like to have in your table.  For example, in the image below (click if you want to see a larger version), I have dragged over 3 columns, and two rows, to create a 3×2 table.  Thanks to live preview, you can see the resulting table IN REAL TIME as you move the mouse over the grid!  Very nice!
  4. Once you have decided on the number of rows and columns, click on the grid and the table will be inserted!

If you want to insert a table with more than 10 rows, or 10 columns, simply click on “Insert” on the Ribbon, then click on “Table”, and then click on “Insert Table”.  Using this dialog box you can specify exactly how many rows or columns you want.

Once you have created your table, it is very quick and simple to add a splash of colour to your table!

  1. Click on the table you have just created.  You will notice a new set of tabs appear in the Ribbon:
  2. Click on the “Table Styles” selector, and click on your favourite colourscheme:
     
  3. Sit back and enjoy your very attractive, very simple table in Word 2007!

So there you have it… Everything you really need to know to use tables in Word 2007.  Much faster than previous versions don’t you think!!!!!

’till next time

TNP 😉

[tags]Tutorial, Word 2007, Tables[/tags]

One of the most useful features of Word 2007, bronchitis especially when collaborating with colleagues or team members in other offices is Track Changes.  Combined with the comment feature it is easy to understand what changes have taken place in a document, visit this site and why!

Here is an example of what you can do with Track Changes, and a Comment.

How to turn on Track Changes in Word 2007

  1. Click the “Review” Tab in the Word 2007 Ribbon
  2. Click the “Track Changes” button

If you want to incorporate all the changes one of your colleagues made, or reject some whilst approving others, you can do that with the buttons in the “Changes” group, again in the “Review” tab of the Word 2007 Ribbon.

To accept the change, simply click “Accept”.  To reject, click “Reject”.  To move between changes, you can use the “Previous” and “Next” buttons.  Pretty simple really 🙂

How to add a Comment in Word 2007

To add a comment, again on the “Review” tab of the Ribbon, in the “Comments” group, click on “New Comment”.  You will then be able to type your comment into the balloon on the side of the document. 

Note that when you add a comment, it will begin with your initials.  To change your initials, click on the Office Orb, in the top right hand corner of the screen, and then select “Word Options”.  In the “Popular” section (should be the default when you open the options dialog box) there is a text field where you can change the initials.

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO REMEMBER WHEN USING TRACK CHANGES AND COMMENTS IN WORD 2007…

… is to run the document inspector (Office Orb -> Prepare -> Inspect Document) before publishing the document.  Using the document inspector you can be assured that any of your comments or tracking balloons will not be visible to readers of the document.  Especially important if the comments give away some of your trade secrets, or disrespect one of your team mates in some way 😉

’till next time

TNP 😉

[tags]Track Changes, Word 2007, Review, Tutorial[/tags]

Stumbled across this absolute beauty of a Visio template today.  Strictly speaking this will work with Visio 2007 as well as earlier versions like Visio 2003… but I just had to blog about it.

Crime Scenes with shapes – Visio Template

That’s right… you can now play CSI at home, approved without the dangerous explosions, refractionist car chases or other potentially life ending catastrophes that happen on the TV Series.

The Visio Crime Scene template, which you can download from the Microsoft website, contains all the things you need to recreate your favourite crime scene – bodies (with movable arms and legs), separate arms and legs (!), weapons of all varieties (shot guns, pistols, shell casings, clips, even nunjuks!!!), pools of blood (small, large, or trail)… even a king size bed for those domestic disputes.

You can find the FREE Crime Scene Template, as well as many other great Office 2007 templates to download from Microsoft Office Online.

’till next time

TNP 😉

[tags]Visio, Template, CSI, Office 2007[/tags]

So you have just purchased a version of Office 2007 (or your boss just made you upgrade your PC at work!), sildenafil and want to get up to speed quickly on exactly how to use Word 2007.  No sweat – here is the ultimate list of great posts to help you get your head around exactly how to use Word 2007 – fast!

I would start with the first couple, discount and as you build your confidence, generic start tackling some of the more advanced tutorials.

When you first start using Word 2007 – read…

  1. What happened to the File Menu? Help with the new user interface in Office 2007
  2. Screencast: Introduction to the New Ribbon UI in Word 2007
  3. Word 2007: Undo
  4. What are Galleries in Office 2007?
  5. Printing in Word 2007

Once you are comfortable, move on to…

  1. Need more Clip Art in Word 2007?
  2. Inserting a Table in Word 2007
  3. Find and Replace in Word 2007
  4. Word 2007: How to add page numbers to your documents
  5. How to Change your Page Orientation (Portrait vs Landscape) in Word 2007
  6. Breaks in Word 2007 – Page, Column, Text Wrapping and Section Breaks
  7. Word 2007: Page Layout Deep Dive Tutorial
  8. Word 2007: What is the Prepare Menu? Deep Dive
  9. How to Superscript text in Word 2007
  10. Show and Hide Codes in Word 2007
  11. Insert a Drop Cap in Word 2007
  12. Track Changes, and Comments in Word 2007
  13. How to save your Word 2007 document as a PDF
  14. Word 2007 – Send your Document, Share it with the World!

And once you are an absolute power user of Word 2007…

  1. Word 2007: Start Word 2007 without the Splash Screen
  2. Shortcut keys in Word 2007
  3. Word 2007: Minimise the Ribbon (Minimize the menu)
  4. More than just word count – All the document statistics you want in Word 2007 using Status Bar Configuration
  5. Word 97 Look and Feel, with Word 2007!
  6. Lorem Ipsum and other random filler text in Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007
  7. Screencast – Extending the Office 2007 UI with a Custom Ribbon

And to keep track of the latests posts on Word 2007 at The New Paperclip, simply check out the Word 2007 Category 

So there you have it – remember if you have trouble with anything in Word 2007, post a comment and I will try to write a tutorial especially for you! 

Or you could purchase one of these books from Amazon.com

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

I am sure as soon as you thought about upgrading to Office 2007 and looked at the options available, sale
you thought – “dang it, this is going to be hard work deciphering exactly what version (or SKU) of Office I should buy.” 

Well let me save you the hassle and let you know exactly what you are getting when you purchase Microsoft Office Professional 2007:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing / document reading and creation needs
  • Excel 2007
    For crunching the numbers
  • PowerPoint 2007
    For presenting information to your peers
  • Outlook 2007 (with Business Contact Manager)
    To keep in touch with your colleagues through email (and keep track of customer details using the Business Contact Manager)
  • Access 2007
    To build databases to store your important business data
  • Publisher 2007
    To produce professional looking documents, marketing collateral, reports, business cards, banners, signs, websites etc.
  • Accounting Express 2007
    To make managing the finances of your small business (or your EBay empire!) easy

There are two different versions of Microsoft Office Professional 2007 that you can buy.  The first is a full version of the product, which you need to buy if you do not currently have a version of Office on your computer. 

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Are you a teacher, dosage
student, price
or home user of Office, misbirth
and want to upgrade or buy a full version of Office 2007?  Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 is probably the best version for you.  Why?  Well it is cheaper than most of the other office suites, but includes all the programs you are most likely to use every day.

What programs are included in Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007?

There are four different programs which come with Home and Student edition.  They are:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing, typing, document creation needs.  Great for school, college or university homework and assignments.
  • Excel 2007
    Covers all your number crunching spreadsheet needs.  Great for creating graphs and reports for your homework or assignments
  • PowerPoint 2007
    Enables you to create your own presentations.  Capture your ideas, and share them with an audience.  Again great for homework or assignments where you need to present in front of a class or audience
  • OneNote 2007
    OneNote is great for taking notes, jotting down information, and keeping track of things.  Just like a paper notebook, except electronic!  Again fantastic for school, college of university, as you can keep your research notes all in one place.

Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 (along with all other Microsoft Office suites, and individual products) will be available in late January, and will cost around USD$150

TNP 😉

Have you upgraded from Excel 2003 to Excel 2007 but are unsure where some of your favourite commands are in the new ribbon user interface?  Don’t worry… here is a quick guide for some of my (and hopefully your) favourite Excel commands:

  1. Create a New Spreadsheet in Excel 2007
    Click on the Microsoft Office button (the circle in the top left hand corner of the screen), stuff and select new
  2. Insert Rows in Excel 2007
    Click on the ‘Home’ tab of the Ribbon, and then in the ‘Cells’ group, click ‘Insert’, and then click on ‘Insert Rows’
  3. Check Spelling in Excel 2007
    Click on the ‘Review’ tab of the Ribbon, and then in the ‘Proofing’ group, click ‘Spelling’.  Or you could use the shortcut key, which is F7
  4. How to AutoSum in Excel 2007
    First select the cells that you want to AutoSum, and then click on the ‘Home’ tab, look in the ‘Editing’ group, click ‘Sum’, and then click ‘Sum’
  5. Save your Spreadsheet in Excel 2007
    You can either click on the Microsoft Office Button (the circle in the top left hand corner of the screen) and select Save (or Save As), or you can click on the Save button in the Quick Access Toolbar (you can find the Quick Access Toolbar in the top left hand corner of the screen, just near the Microsoft Office button.)

Do you want to know where all your other favourite Excel 2003 commands are hidden (I mean where your favourite buttons can be found!)?  Microsoft have put together a great tool to help you out.  You can find the Interactive Excel 2003 to Excel 2007 command reference guide on the Microsoft Office website

’till next time

TNP 😉 

[tags]Excel 2007, Office, 2007, Help, Tutorial, Command Reference[/tags]

Do you love creating documents that are full of pictures?  Are you sick and tired of the same old Clip Art that comes included with Word?  Do you need more Clip Art for Word 2007, viagra 100mg PowerPoint 2007, somnology Publisher 2007, more about or any of the Microsoft Office 2007 programs? 

You are in luck!

Microsoft have a website that has over 150,000 (that’s one hundred and fifty THOUSAND!) free images and sounds that you can add to your documents, spreadsheets, or Publisher creations.

To search through the extensive online FREE Clip Art library, all you need to do is go to the Clip Art page on Microsoft Office Online, and type your search into the box at the top of the screen!

[tags]Clip Art, Office 2007, Stock[/tags]

Do you love creating documents that are full of pictures?  Are you sick and tired of the same old Clip Art that comes included with Word?  Do you need more Clip Art for Word 2007, viagra 100mg PowerPoint 2007, somnology Publisher 2007, more about or any of the Microsoft Office 2007 programs? 

You are in luck!

Microsoft have a website that has over 150,000 (that’s one hundred and fifty THOUSAND!) free images and sounds that you can add to your documents, spreadsheets, or Publisher creations.

To search through the extensive online FREE Clip Art library, all you need to do is go to the Clip Art page on Microsoft Office Online, and type your search into the box at the top of the screen!

[tags]Clip Art, Office 2007, Stock[/tags]

So you are going on holiday and need to let everyone know that you are not going to be answering their emails, resuscitator
looking at their funny forwards, nurse or reading about Nigerian money scams in your junk mail folder!

The Out of Office Assistant looks after your inbox whilst you are away, store
by replying with a custom message whenever someone sends you an email.  The message could be as simple as “Hi, I am not in the Office, email will not be read until I return”… or could include alternative contact details, or maybe the contact details of a colleague who is looking after your job whilst you are away.

To turn on the Out of Office Assistant in Outlook 2007:

  1. On the Tools menu in Outlook 2007, click on “Out of Office Assistant”
  2. Select “I am currently Out of the Office”
  3. Type your custom message in the box below
  4. Click OK

Simple as that!  If you could not find the Out of Office Assistant button in the tools menu, it might mean you are not using an Exchange server at your workplace.  Outlook needs to be connected to an Exchange server for the Out of Office Assistant to work properly (or at all!)

When you get back from holidays… you will want to turn off your Out of Office Assistant.

In Outlook 2007, in the tools menu select “Out of Office Assistant”.  Then select “I am in the Office”

Get Smart with the Out of Office Assistant!

You can get smarter with the Out of Office Assistant in Outlook 2007… by adding additional rules to be processed whenever an email appears in your inbox.  For example, you might want to delete every email from your boss (not recommended), or move emails from a distribution list into a folder you have set up. 

To add more rules to your Out of Office Assistant… go to the tools menu again, select “Out of Office Assistant”, and then click “Add Rule”.

Now you can go on holiday and not have to worry about your email every 5 minutes!

[tags]OOF, Outlook 2007, Tips, Help, Out of Office[/tags]

Thats right… 23 Sleeps, ailment thats 552 hours, internist or  33120 minutes until Office 2007, try and Windows Vista will be available in the shops.  January 30 is not that far away!

You can pre-order your copy of Windows Vista or Office 2007 now on Amazon.com!  They can even gift wrap it for you!

Over the next three weeks I will be in overdrive making sure that you have all the tips, tricks and tutorials you need to hit the ground running as soon as you take off the shrink wrap on your own copy of Office 2007.

Make sure that you subscribe to the feed, and if you have any areas that you would like me to focus on… make sure you leave a comment!

’till next time

TNP 😉

[tags]Windows Vista, Office 2007, Launch[/tags]

Inserting tables in Word 2007 has changed slightly from previous versions of Office, buy however it really is a piece of cake with the new Ribbon user interface, and my favourite feature of all… live preview!

  1. On the ribbon, click “Insert” (because we want to “Insert” a table)
  2. Click on the “Table” button,  and a grid will appear below it.
  3. Drag your mouse over the grid, selecting the number of columns and rows that you would like to have in your table.  For example, in the image below (click if you want to see a larger version), I have dragged over 3 columns, and two rows, to create a 3×2 table.  Thanks to live preview, you can see the resulting table IN REAL TIME as you move the mouse over the grid!  Very nice!
  4. Once you have decided on the number of rows and columns, click on the grid and the table will be inserted!

If you want to insert a table with more than 10 rows, or 10 columns, simply click on “Insert” on the Ribbon, then click on “Table”, and then click on “Insert Table”.  Using this dialog box you can specify exactly how many rows or columns you want.

Once you have created your table, it is very quick and simple to add a splash of colour to your table!

  1. Click on the table you have just created.  You will notice a new set of tabs appear in the Ribbon:
  2. Click on the “Table Styles” selector, and click on your favourite colourscheme:
     
  3. Sit back and enjoy your very attractive, very simple table in Word 2007!

So there you have it… Everything you really need to know to use tables in Word 2007.  Much faster than previous versions don’t you think!!!!!

’till next time

TNP 😉

[tags]Tutorial, Word 2007, Tables[/tags]

One of the most useful features of Word 2007, bronchitis especially when collaborating with colleagues or team members in other offices is Track Changes.  Combined with the comment feature it is easy to understand what changes have taken place in a document, visit this site and why!

Here is an example of what you can do with Track Changes, and a Comment.

How to turn on Track Changes in Word 2007

  1. Click the “Review” Tab in the Word 2007 Ribbon
  2. Click the “Track Changes” button

If you want to incorporate all the changes one of your colleagues made, or reject some whilst approving others, you can do that with the buttons in the “Changes” group, again in the “Review” tab of the Word 2007 Ribbon.

To accept the change, simply click “Accept”.  To reject, click “Reject”.  To move between changes, you can use the “Previous” and “Next” buttons.  Pretty simple really 🙂

How to add a Comment in Word 2007

To add a comment, again on the “Review” tab of the Ribbon, in the “Comments” group, click on “New Comment”.  You will then be able to type your comment into the balloon on the side of the document. 

Note that when you add a comment, it will begin with your initials.  To change your initials, click on the Office Orb, in the top right hand corner of the screen, and then select “Word Options”.  In the “Popular” section (should be the default when you open the options dialog box) there is a text field where you can change the initials.

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO REMEMBER WHEN USING TRACK CHANGES AND COMMENTS IN WORD 2007…

… is to run the document inspector (Office Orb -> Prepare -> Inspect Document) before publishing the document.  Using the document inspector you can be assured that any of your comments or tracking balloons will not be visible to readers of the document.  Especially important if the comments give away some of your trade secrets, or disrespect one of your team mates in some way 😉

’till next time

TNP 😉

[tags]Track Changes, Word 2007, Review, Tutorial[/tags]

Stumbled across this absolute beauty of a Visio template today.  Strictly speaking this will work with Visio 2007 as well as earlier versions like Visio 2003… but I just had to blog about it.

Crime Scenes with shapes – Visio Template

That’s right… you can now play CSI at home, approved without the dangerous explosions, refractionist car chases or other potentially life ending catastrophes that happen on the TV Series.

The Visio Crime Scene template, which you can download from the Microsoft website, contains all the things you need to recreate your favourite crime scene – bodies (with movable arms and legs), separate arms and legs (!), weapons of all varieties (shot guns, pistols, shell casings, clips, even nunjuks!!!), pools of blood (small, large, or trail)… even a king size bed for those domestic disputes.

You can find the FREE Crime Scene Template, as well as many other great Office 2007 templates to download from Microsoft Office Online.

’till next time

TNP 😉

[tags]Visio, Template, CSI, Office 2007[/tags]

So you have just purchased a version of Office 2007 (or your boss just made you upgrade your PC at work!), sildenafil and want to get up to speed quickly on exactly how to use Word 2007.  No sweat – here is the ultimate list of great posts to help you get your head around exactly how to use Word 2007 – fast!

I would start with the first couple, discount and as you build your confidence, generic start tackling some of the more advanced tutorials.

When you first start using Word 2007 – read…

  1. What happened to the File Menu? Help with the new user interface in Office 2007
  2. Screencast: Introduction to the New Ribbon UI in Word 2007
  3. Word 2007: Undo
  4. What are Galleries in Office 2007?
  5. Printing in Word 2007

Once you are comfortable, move on to…

  1. Need more Clip Art in Word 2007?
  2. Inserting a Table in Word 2007
  3. Find and Replace in Word 2007
  4. Word 2007: How to add page numbers to your documents
  5. How to Change your Page Orientation (Portrait vs Landscape) in Word 2007
  6. Breaks in Word 2007 – Page, Column, Text Wrapping and Section Breaks
  7. Word 2007: Page Layout Deep Dive Tutorial
  8. Word 2007: What is the Prepare Menu? Deep Dive
  9. How to Superscript text in Word 2007
  10. Show and Hide Codes in Word 2007
  11. Insert a Drop Cap in Word 2007
  12. Track Changes, and Comments in Word 2007
  13. How to save your Word 2007 document as a PDF
  14. Word 2007 – Send your Document, Share it with the World!

And once you are an absolute power user of Word 2007…

  1. Word 2007: Start Word 2007 without the Splash Screen
  2. Shortcut keys in Word 2007
  3. Word 2007: Minimise the Ribbon (Minimize the menu)
  4. More than just word count – All the document statistics you want in Word 2007 using Status Bar Configuration
  5. Word 97 Look and Feel, with Word 2007!
  6. Lorem Ipsum and other random filler text in Word 2007, PowerPoint 2007, and Excel 2007
  7. Screencast – Extending the Office 2007 UI with a Custom Ribbon

And to keep track of the latests posts on Word 2007 at The New Paperclip, simply check out the Word 2007 Category 

So there you have it – remember if you have trouble with anything in Word 2007, post a comment and I will try to write a tutorial especially for you! 

Or you could purchase one of these books from Amazon.com

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

I am sure as soon as you thought about upgrading to Office 2007 and looked at the options available, sale
you thought – “dang it, this is going to be hard work deciphering exactly what version (or SKU) of Office I should buy.” 

Well let me save you the hassle and let you know exactly what you are getting when you purchase Microsoft Office Professional 2007:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing / document reading and creation needs
  • Excel 2007
    For crunching the numbers
  • PowerPoint 2007
    For presenting information to your peers
  • Outlook 2007 (with Business Contact Manager)
    To keep in touch with your colleagues through email (and keep track of customer details using the Business Contact Manager)
  • Access 2007
    To build databases to store your important business data
  • Publisher 2007
    To produce professional looking documents, marketing collateral, reports, business cards, banners, signs, websites etc.
  • Accounting Express 2007
    To make managing the finances of your small business (or your EBay empire!) easy

There are two different versions of Microsoft Office Professional 2007 that you can buy.  The first is a full version of the product, which you need to buy if you do not currently have a version of Office on your computer. 

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

I am sure as soon as you thought about upgrading to Office 2007 and looked at the options available, sale
you thought – “dang it, this is going to be hard work deciphering exactly what version (or SKU) of Office I should buy.” 

Well let me save you the hassle and let you know exactly what you are getting when you purchase Microsoft Office Professional 2007:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing / document reading and creation needs
  • Excel 2007
    For crunching the numbers
  • PowerPoint 2007
    For presenting information to your peers
  • Outlook 2007 (with Business Contact Manager)
    To keep in touch with your colleagues through email (and keep track of customer details using the Business Contact Manager)
  • Access 2007
    To build databases to store your important business data
  • Publisher 2007
    To produce professional looking documents, marketing collateral, reports, business cards, banners, signs, websites etc.
  • Accounting Express 2007
    To make managing the finances of your small business (or your EBay empire!) easy

There are two different versions of Microsoft Office Professional 2007 that you can buy.  The first is a full version of the product, which you need to buy if you do not currently have a version of Office on your computer. 

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Are you a teacher, dosage
student, price
or home user of Office, misbirth
and want to upgrade or buy a full version of Office 2007?  Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 is probably the best version for you.  Why?  Well it is cheaper than most of the other office suites, but includes all the programs you are most likely to use every day.

What programs are included in Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007?

There are four different programs which come with Home and Student edition.  They are:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing, typing, document creation needs.  Great for school, college or university homework and assignments.
  • Excel 2007
    Covers all your number crunching spreadsheet needs.  Great for creating graphs and reports for your homework or assignments
  • PowerPoint 2007
    Enables you to create your own presentations.  Capture your ideas, and share them with an audience.  Again great for homework or assignments where you need to present in front of a class or audience
  • OneNote 2007
    OneNote is great for taking notes, jotting down information, and keeping track of things.  Just like a paper notebook, except electronic!  Again fantastic for school, college of university, as you can keep your research notes all in one place.

Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 (along with all other Microsoft Office suites, and individual products) will be available in late January, and will cost around USD$150

TNP 😉

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

I am sure as soon as you thought about upgrading to Office 2007 and looked at the options available, sale
you thought – “dang it, this is going to be hard work deciphering exactly what version (or SKU) of Office I should buy.” 

Well let me save you the hassle and let you know exactly what you are getting when you purchase Microsoft Office Professional 2007:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing / document reading and creation needs
  • Excel 2007
    For crunching the numbers
  • PowerPoint 2007
    For presenting information to your peers
  • Outlook 2007 (with Business Contact Manager)
    To keep in touch with your colleagues through email (and keep track of customer details using the Business Contact Manager)
  • Access 2007
    To build databases to store your important business data
  • Publisher 2007
    To produce professional looking documents, marketing collateral, reports, business cards, banners, signs, websites etc.
  • Accounting Express 2007
    To make managing the finances of your small business (or your EBay empire!) easy

There are two different versions of Microsoft Office Professional 2007 that you can buy.  The first is a full version of the product, which you need to buy if you do not currently have a version of Office on your computer. 

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

I am sure as soon as you thought about upgrading to Office 2007 and looked at the options available, sale
you thought – “dang it, this is going to be hard work deciphering exactly what version (or SKU) of Office I should buy.” 

Well let me save you the hassle and let you know exactly what you are getting when you purchase Microsoft Office Professional 2007:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing / document reading and creation needs
  • Excel 2007
    For crunching the numbers
  • PowerPoint 2007
    For presenting information to your peers
  • Outlook 2007 (with Business Contact Manager)
    To keep in touch with your colleagues through email (and keep track of customer details using the Business Contact Manager)
  • Access 2007
    To build databases to store your important business data
  • Publisher 2007
    To produce professional looking documents, marketing collateral, reports, business cards, banners, signs, websites etc.
  • Accounting Express 2007
    To make managing the finances of your small business (or your EBay empire!) easy

There are two different versions of Microsoft Office Professional 2007 that you can buy.  The first is a full version of the product, which you need to buy if you do not currently have a version of Office on your computer. 

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Are you a teacher, dosage
student, price
or home user of Office, misbirth
and want to upgrade or buy a full version of Office 2007?  Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 is probably the best version for you.  Why?  Well it is cheaper than most of the other office suites, but includes all the programs you are most likely to use every day.

What programs are included in Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007?

There are four different programs which come with Home and Student edition.  They are:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing, typing, document creation needs.  Great for school, college or university homework and assignments.
  • Excel 2007
    Covers all your number crunching spreadsheet needs.  Great for creating graphs and reports for your homework or assignments
  • PowerPoint 2007
    Enables you to create your own presentations.  Capture your ideas, and share them with an audience.  Again great for homework or assignments where you need to present in front of a class or audience
  • OneNote 2007
    OneNote is great for taking notes, jotting down information, and keeping track of things.  Just like a paper notebook, except electronic!  Again fantastic for school, college of university, as you can keep your research notes all in one place.

Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 (along with all other Microsoft Office suites, and individual products) will be available in late January, and will cost around USD$150

TNP 😉

Have you upgraded from Excel 2003 to Excel 2007 but are unsure where some of your favourite commands are in the new ribbon user interface?  Don’t worry… here is a quick guide for some of my (and hopefully your) favourite Excel commands:

  1. Create a New Spreadsheet in Excel 2007
    Click on the Microsoft Office button (the circle in the top left hand corner of the screen), stuff and select new
  2. Insert Rows in Excel 2007
    Click on the ‘Home’ tab of the Ribbon, and then in the ‘Cells’ group, click ‘Insert’, and then click on ‘Insert Rows’
  3. Check Spelling in Excel 2007
    Click on the ‘Review’ tab of the Ribbon, and then in the ‘Proofing’ group, click ‘Spelling’.  Or you could use the shortcut key, which is F7
  4. How to AutoSum in Excel 2007
    First select the cells that you want to AutoSum, and then click on the ‘Home’ tab, look in the ‘Editing’ group, click ‘Sum’, and then click ‘Sum’
  5. Save your Spreadsheet in Excel 2007
    You can either click on the Microsoft Office Button (the circle in the top left hand corner of the screen) and select Save (or Save As), or you can click on the Save button in the Quick Access Toolbar (you can find the Quick Access Toolbar in the top left hand corner of the screen, just near the Microsoft Office button.)

Do you want to know where all your other favourite Excel 2003 commands are hidden (I mean where your favourite buttons can be found!)?  Microsoft have put together a great tool to help you out.  You can find the Interactive Excel 2003 to Excel 2007 command reference guide on the Microsoft Office website

’till next time

TNP 😉 

[tags]Excel 2007, Office, 2007, Help, Tutorial, Command Reference[/tags]

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

I am sure as soon as you thought about upgrading to Office 2007 and looked at the options available, sale
you thought – “dang it, this is going to be hard work deciphering exactly what version (or SKU) of Office I should buy.” 

Well let me save you the hassle and let you know exactly what you are getting when you purchase Microsoft Office Professional 2007:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing / document reading and creation needs
  • Excel 2007
    For crunching the numbers
  • PowerPoint 2007
    For presenting information to your peers
  • Outlook 2007 (with Business Contact Manager)
    To keep in touch with your colleagues through email (and keep track of customer details using the Business Contact Manager)
  • Access 2007
    To build databases to store your important business data
  • Publisher 2007
    To produce professional looking documents, marketing collateral, reports, business cards, banners, signs, websites etc.
  • Accounting Express 2007
    To make managing the finances of your small business (or your EBay empire!) easy

There are two different versions of Microsoft Office Professional 2007 that you can buy.  The first is a full version of the product, which you need to buy if you do not currently have a version of Office on your computer. 

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

I am sure as soon as you thought about upgrading to Office 2007 and looked at the options available, sale
you thought – “dang it, this is going to be hard work deciphering exactly what version (or SKU) of Office I should buy.” 

Well let me save you the hassle and let you know exactly what you are getting when you purchase Microsoft Office Professional 2007:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing / document reading and creation needs
  • Excel 2007
    For crunching the numbers
  • PowerPoint 2007
    For presenting information to your peers
  • Outlook 2007 (with Business Contact Manager)
    To keep in touch with your colleagues through email (and keep track of customer details using the Business Contact Manager)
  • Access 2007
    To build databases to store your important business data
  • Publisher 2007
    To produce professional looking documents, marketing collateral, reports, business cards, banners, signs, websites etc.
  • Accounting Express 2007
    To make managing the finances of your small business (or your EBay empire!) easy

There are two different versions of Microsoft Office Professional 2007 that you can buy.  The first is a full version of the product, which you need to buy if you do not currently have a version of Office on your computer. 

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Are you a teacher, dosage
student, price
or home user of Office, misbirth
and want to upgrade or buy a full version of Office 2007?  Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 is probably the best version for you.  Why?  Well it is cheaper than most of the other office suites, but includes all the programs you are most likely to use every day.

What programs are included in Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007?

There are four different programs which come with Home and Student edition.  They are:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing, typing, document creation needs.  Great for school, college or university homework and assignments.
  • Excel 2007
    Covers all your number crunching spreadsheet needs.  Great for creating graphs and reports for your homework or assignments
  • PowerPoint 2007
    Enables you to create your own presentations.  Capture your ideas, and share them with an audience.  Again great for homework or assignments where you need to present in front of a class or audience
  • OneNote 2007
    OneNote is great for taking notes, jotting down information, and keeping track of things.  Just like a paper notebook, except electronic!  Again fantastic for school, college of university, as you can keep your research notes all in one place.

Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 (along with all other Microsoft Office suites, and individual products) will be available in late January, and will cost around USD$150

TNP 😉

Have you upgraded from Excel 2003 to Excel 2007 but are unsure where some of your favourite commands are in the new ribbon user interface?  Don’t worry… here is a quick guide for some of my (and hopefully your) favourite Excel commands:

  1. Create a New Spreadsheet in Excel 2007
    Click on the Microsoft Office button (the circle in the top left hand corner of the screen), stuff and select new
  2. Insert Rows in Excel 2007
    Click on the ‘Home’ tab of the Ribbon, and then in the ‘Cells’ group, click ‘Insert’, and then click on ‘Insert Rows’
  3. Check Spelling in Excel 2007
    Click on the ‘Review’ tab of the Ribbon, and then in the ‘Proofing’ group, click ‘Spelling’.  Or you could use the shortcut key, which is F7
  4. How to AutoSum in Excel 2007
    First select the cells that you want to AutoSum, and then click on the ‘Home’ tab, look in the ‘Editing’ group, click ‘Sum’, and then click ‘Sum’
  5. Save your Spreadsheet in Excel 2007
    You can either click on the Microsoft Office Button (the circle in the top left hand corner of the screen) and select Save (or Save As), or you can click on the Save button in the Quick Access Toolbar (you can find the Quick Access Toolbar in the top left hand corner of the screen, just near the Microsoft Office button.)

Do you want to know where all your other favourite Excel 2003 commands are hidden (I mean where your favourite buttons can be found!)?  Microsoft have put together a great tool to help you out.  You can find the Interactive Excel 2003 to Excel 2007 command reference guide on the Microsoft Office website

’till next time

TNP 😉 

[tags]Excel 2007, Office, 2007, Help, Tutorial, Command Reference[/tags]

Do you love creating documents that are full of pictures?  Are you sick and tired of the same old Clip Art that comes included with Word?  Do you need more Clip Art for Word 2007, viagra 100mg PowerPoint 2007, somnology Publisher 2007, more about or any of the Microsoft Office 2007 programs? 

You are in luck!

Microsoft have a website that has over 150,000 (that’s one hundred and fifty THOUSAND!) free images and sounds that you can add to your documents, spreadsheets, or Publisher creations.

To search through the extensive online FREE Clip Art library, all you need to do is go to the Clip Art page on Microsoft Office Online, and type your search into the box at the top of the screen!

[tags]Clip Art, Office 2007, Stock[/tags]

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

I am sure as soon as you thought about upgrading to Office 2007 and looked at the options available, sale
you thought – “dang it, this is going to be hard work deciphering exactly what version (or SKU) of Office I should buy.” 

Well let me save you the hassle and let you know exactly what you are getting when you purchase Microsoft Office Professional 2007:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing / document reading and creation needs
  • Excel 2007
    For crunching the numbers
  • PowerPoint 2007
    For presenting information to your peers
  • Outlook 2007 (with Business Contact Manager)
    To keep in touch with your colleagues through email (and keep track of customer details using the Business Contact Manager)
  • Access 2007
    To build databases to store your important business data
  • Publisher 2007
    To produce professional looking documents, marketing collateral, reports, business cards, banners, signs, websites etc.
  • Accounting Express 2007
    To make managing the finances of your small business (or your EBay empire!) easy

There are two different versions of Microsoft Office Professional 2007 that you can buy.  The first is a full version of the product, which you need to buy if you do not currently have a version of Office on your computer. 

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Love to see comments like this one I received today!

“I love your website! You make changing to Office 07 much more better with all your tips and stuff. The way you say it makes me understand, purchase and get the idea more better. Thanks!” – Michael, pharm Houston, for sale USA

Keep the comments coming, and let me know what you want me to write about.  I now have my hands on a RTM copy of Office 2007 Professional, so I will be pumping more Office 2007 Tips, Tricks and Tutorials in the coming weeks.

Cheers,

TNP 😉

I am sure as soon as you thought about upgrading to Office 2007 and looked at the options available, sale
you thought – “dang it, this is going to be hard work deciphering exactly what version (or SKU) of Office I should buy.” 

Well let me save you the hassle and let you know exactly what you are getting when you purchase Microsoft Office Professional 2007:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing / document reading and creation needs
  • Excel 2007
    For crunching the numbers
  • PowerPoint 2007
    For presenting information to your peers
  • Outlook 2007 (with Business Contact Manager)
    To keep in touch with your colleagues through email (and keep track of customer details using the Business Contact Manager)
  • Access 2007
    To build databases to store your important business data
  • Publisher 2007
    To produce professional looking documents, marketing collateral, reports, business cards, banners, signs, websites etc.
  • Accounting Express 2007
    To make managing the finances of your small business (or your EBay empire!) easy

There are two different versions of Microsoft Office Professional 2007 that you can buy.  The first is a full version of the product, which you need to buy if you do not currently have a version of Office on your computer. 

If you currently use Office on your computer, then you can purchase the UPGRADE version, which is a lot cheaper!

Are you a teacher, dosage
student, price
or home user of Office, misbirth
and want to upgrade or buy a full version of Office 2007?  Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 is probably the best version for you.  Why?  Well it is cheaper than most of the other office suites, but includes all the programs you are most likely to use every day.

What programs are included in Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007?

There are four different programs which come with Home and Student edition.  They are:

  • Word 2007
    For all your word processing, typing, document creation needs.  Great for school, college or university homework and assignments.
  • Excel 2007
    Covers all your number crunching spreadsheet needs.  Great for creating graphs and reports for your homework or assignments
  • PowerPoint 2007
    Enables you to create your own presentations.  Capture your ideas, and share them with an audience.  Again great for homework or assignments where you need to present in front of a class or audience
  • OneNote 2007
    OneNote is great for taking notes, jotting down information, and keeping track of things.  Just like a paper notebook, except electronic!  Again fantastic for school, college of university, as you can keep your research notes all in one place.

Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 (along with all other Microsoft Office suites, and individual products) will be available in late January, and will cost around USD$150

TNP 😉

Have you upgraded from Excel 2003 to Excel 2007 but are unsure where some of your favourite commands are in the new ribbon user interface?  Don’t worry… here is a quick guide for some of my (and hopefully your) favourite Excel commands:

  1. Create a New Spreadsheet in Excel 2007
    Click on the Microsoft Office button (the circle in the top left hand corner of the screen), stuff and select new
  2. Insert Rows in Excel 2007
    Click on the ‘Home’ tab of the Ribbon, and then in the ‘Cells’ group, click ‘Insert’, and then click on ‘Insert Rows’
  3. Check Spelling in Excel 2007
    Click on the ‘Review’ tab of the Ribbon, and then in the ‘Proofing’ group, click ‘Spelling’.  Or you could use the shortcut key, which is F7
  4. How to AutoSum in Excel 2007
    First select the cells that you want to AutoSum, and then click on the ‘Home’ tab, look in the ‘Editing’ group, click ‘Sum’, and then click ‘Sum’
  5. Save your Spreadsheet in Excel 2007
    You can either click on the Microsoft Office Button (the circle in the top left hand corner of the screen) and select Save (or Save As), or you can click on the Save button in the Quick Access Toolbar (you can find the Quick Access Toolbar in the top left hand corner of the screen, just near the Microsoft Office button.)

Do you want to know where all your other favourite Excel 2003 commands are hidden (I mean where your favourite buttons can be found!)?  Microsoft have put together a great tool to help you out.  You can find the Interactive Excel 2003 to Excel 2007 command reference guide on the Microsoft Office website

’till next time

TNP 😉 

[tags]Excel 2007, Office, 2007, Help, Tutorial, Command Reference[/tags]

Do you love creating documents that are full of pictures?  Are you sick and tired of the same old Clip Art that comes included with Word?  Do you need more Clip Art for Word 2007, viagra 100mg PowerPoint 2007, somnology Publisher 2007, more about or any of the Microsoft Office 2007 programs? 

You are in luck!

Microsoft have a website that has over 150,000 (that’s one hundred and fifty THOUSAND!) free images and sounds that you can add to your documents, spreadsheets, or Publisher creations.

To search through the extensive online FREE Clip Art library, all you need to do is go to the Clip Art page on Microsoft Office Online, and type your search into the box at the top of the screen!

[tags]Clip Art, Office 2007, Stock[/tags]

Do you love creating documents that are full of pictures?  Are you sick and tired of the same old Clip Art that comes included with Word?  Do you need more Clip Art for Word 2007, viagra 100mg PowerPoint 2007, somnology Publisher 2007, more about or any of the Microsoft Office 2007 programs? 

You are in luck!

Microsoft have a website that has over 150,000 (that’s one hundred and fifty THOUSAND!) free images and sounds that you can add to your documents, spreadsheets, or Publisher creations.

To search through the extensive online FREE Clip Art library, all you need to do is go to the Clip Art page on Microsoft Office Online, and type your search into the box at the top of the screen!

[tags]Clip Art, Office 2007, Stock[/tags]

So you are going on holiday and need to let everyone know that you are not going to be answering their emails, resuscitator
looking at their funny forwards, nurse or reading about Nigerian money scams in your junk mail folder!

The Out of Office Assistant looks after your inbox whilst you are away, store
by replying with a custom message whenever someone sends you an email.  The message could be as simple as “Hi, I am not in the Office, email will not be read until I return”… or could include alternative contact details, or maybe the contact details of a colleague who is looking after your job whilst you are away.

To turn on the Out of Office Assistant in Outlook 2007:

  1. On the Tools menu in Outlook 2007, click on “Out of Office Assistant”
  2. Select “I am currently Out of the Office”
  3. Type your custom message in the box below
  4. Click OK

Simple as that!  If you could not find the Out of Office Assistant button in the tools menu, it might mean you are not using an Exchange server at your workplace.  Outlook needs to be connected to an Exchange server for the Out of Office Assistant to work properly (or at all!)

When you get back from holidays… you will want to turn off your Out of Office Assistant.

In Outlook 2007, in the tools menu select “Out of Office Assistant”.  Then select “I am in the Office”

Get Smart with the Out of Office Assistant!

You can get smarter with the Out of Office Assistant in Outlook 2007… by adding additional rules to be processed whenever an email appears in your inbox.  For example, you might want to delete every email from your boss (not recommended), or move emails from a distribution list into a folder you have set up. 

To add more rules to your Out of Office Assistant… go to the tools menu again, select “Out of Office Assistant”, and then click “Add Rule”.

Now you can go on holiday and not have to worry about your email every 5 minutes!

[tags]OOF, Outlook 2007, Tips, Help, Out of Office[/tags]

In the corporate world, link denture there is a tendency to want to brand every slide with your company logo.  Even worse, resuscitator treatment use the company colours and washed out ‘people shaking hands’ image that the CEO demands is on every slide.  How can you make sure that the logo or image appear on every slide?  By putting them into the Slide Master.

Think of the Slide Master as the ‘head honcho’ slide.  All the other slides in your presentation look up the the Slide Master, and copy (inherit) whatever the Slide Master look like.  Generally, if you place the company logo on the bottom right of the Slide Master, every slide in your presentation will have the company logo on the bottom right of the slide.

That is all well and good, but how do you get to the slide master view, especially since the user interface has changed in PowerPoint 2007?

1) Click the ‘View’ Ribbon Tab, then in the Presentation views group, select ‘Slide Master’

or

2) In the bottom right hand corner of the screen (just to the left of the zoom slider) hold shift and click ‘Normal Layout’.  This will switch to the master slide view.  To change back to the normal layout, just click normal layout, normally.  See the image below which explains it far better.

(PS – the pen work in the above image was created using a very bad mouse and the most powerful program in Windows – MSPAINT!  If anyone has a spare tablet (or tablet PC for that matter) that they want to permanently lend me, please let me know!)

[tags]PowerPoint2007, Slide Master, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive into the document preparation features that you can find in the Prepare menu in Word 2007.  Hope that helps!

TNP

[tags]Word 2007, Prepare, Rights Management, Tips, Help[/tags]

Exciting news!!!  My sources at Microsoft have all been spruiking that Microsoft Office 2007 has now reached the magic milestone that is RTM.

If you are a MSDN subscriber, search
you can expect the gold code to be available in the next few days.

If you are a consumer, diagnosis
we still need to wait until early next year to purchase Microsoft Office 2007 from the shops!

So now that Office 2007 is available, are there any areas that you need me to cover?  Over the next week or two I think I will get back to basics and build tutorials that cover the products (Word 2007, Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007 and Outlook 2007 to start with) from the ground up!

If you have any suggestions… please leave a comment and let me know.

TNP 😉

[tags]Office 2007, RTM, Tutorial[/tags]

Apart from the new Ribbon User Interface, no rx there are a few more ‘menu concepts’ that new users of Word 2007 (and Office 2007 in general) need to get their heads around.  The one that is most obvious is the “Prepare Menu”.  You will find the prepare menu when you click on the Office 2007 orb, approved in the top left hand corner of the screen (basically what was the “File” menu in older versions of Word)

What is the Prepare Menu?

The prepare menu is a collection of functionality which a user might use to prepare their work for publication, site storage or distribution, once they have finished the content of the document.  This might include adding some meta data to the document (for use in a EDRMS or document management system), adding a digital signature (to ensure the integrity of the document), or even checking that the document is compatible with older versions of Word.

Lets have a in depth look at what each of the options in the Prepare menu do.

Properties

By clicking on the properties option, you can add meta data to describe your document.  As you can see from the screenshot, the meta data you can add to your Word 2007 document includes:

  • Author – The name of the person who created the document
  • Title – The title of the document
  • Subject – the subject or topic of the document
  • Keywords – a few words which describe the document
  • Category – the category that the document falls into
  • Status – the status of the document (Draft, Final, For Review etc)
  • Comments – can be any comment which adds value to the document, or used for an abstract.

In the Document Properties Pane, if you click on the down arrow beside Document Properties you can launch the “Advanced Properties” box.  From this box you can add even more meta data to your document, with another 27 or so different options, ranging from the Client the document is for, to who Typed the document in the first place.

Inspect Document

The Inspect Document function checks to make sure there is nothing hidden in your document that a reader might find later down the track.  This is especially important if you have used track changes, hidden some text (when you should have deleted it), or used some meta data internally to classify the document that you do not want the reader to know about.

Clicking on the Inspect Document function displays a box which allows you to select the type of document inspection you want.  If you are dealing with a small document (say below 100 pages) there is no problem inspecting using all five options.  As your document grows however, the inspection will take longer, so you might only want to inspect for comments, revisions, versions and annotations.

Encrypt Document

By selecting Encrypt Document from the Prepare menu in Word 2007, you can add a password to protect your document.  Just type your password in once, then re-type it to make sure it is correct, and your Word 2007 document is encrypted.

Restrict Permission

This prepare menu option allows you to grant specific rights to viewers of the document.  For example, if you only want people to be able to read a document, but not print it or save it, you can grant those privileges using the Restrict Permission option.

This functionality is based on Rights Management Services for Windows Server 2003.  However, if you do not have RMS (or another information rights management infrastructure in your organisation), you can still restrict the permissions on your document using a free trial from Microsoft.  Information on the trial appears when you try to restrict permission on your document for the first time.

Add a Digital Signature

In Word 2007, you can sign your document.  Adding a digital signature is just like signing a document with your own written signature (except it is digital).  To add a digital signature in Word 2007, click on the office orb, select prepare, and then click add a digital signature.

You can create your own digital signature, or purchase one from a third party.  Signatures from third parties hold more credibility because they can be independently verified.

Note that digital signatures are invisible, and you do not actually see a traditional written signature anywhere on the document.

Mark as Final

Mark as final, marks the document as final, sets the document to read-only, and saves it for you.

Run Compatibility Checker

By running the compatibility checker in Word 2007 you can check to see if your document will load in previous versions of Microsoft Word.  This is very important if you work with customers or suppliers who may be running older versions of Word.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a deep dive in